Andy Wood: “Remembering social change and political conflict in early modern England”

Andy Wood, de l’Université de Durham, présentera sa communication « Remembering social change and political conflict in early modern England » le jeudi 3 décembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Discutant: Pierre Lurbe, de l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne.

Résumé: This paper deals with the ways in which memories of warfare, reformation, rebellion and civil war played out in England between the early sixteenth century and the early eighteenth century. It focusses in particular upon popular memory, deploying fresh archival material in order to reconstruct memories of religious, political and military conflict. The paper emphasises the significance of memories of conflict for the ways in which political identities confessional disputes were fought out within England. This was due, it is argued, to the continuing divisions of the 1640s – memories of which shaped political conflicts into the early Georgian period. The paper also engages with memories of religious and political conflict in the sixteenth century, arguing that those memories helped to shape contemporary understandings of the period as a distinct phase in English history.

Franziska Heimburger: « Mésentente Cordiale? Languages in the Allied Coalition on the Western Front of the First World War »

Franziska Heimburger, de l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne, présentera sa communication « Mésentente Cordiale? Languages in the Allied Coalition on the Western Front of the First World War » le jeudi 22 octobre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutant : André Loez (historien de la grande guerre, membre du Crid 14-18, professeur en classes préparatoires)

Podcast ci-dessous ou sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Previous scholarship on the Allied coalition during the First World War has tended to stress the misunderstandings and distrust between the individuals representing their countries at high command level. There is an unexplained tension between this mésentente and the durable nature of the coalition and eventual victory of the French, British and Americans on the Western Front which leaves the lower echelons underexplored. In a joint and linked study of language practice and military logistics we can write a history which tells us both how these exchanges were possible and to what extent they contributed to the Allies’ victory. Official and private archival material enables us both to read traces of language from the perspective of the history of international exchanges and also to understand choices in military logistics from the point of view of interpreting and translation studies. Lire la suite

Adrian Gregory: « The Last War: Further reflections on Britain and the Great War »

Adrian Gregory, de Pembroke College, Oxford, présentera sa communication « The Last War: Further reflections on Britain and the Great War » le jeudi 19 février, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Discutante: Franziska Heimburger

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

 

Adrian Gregory est l’auteur de The Last Great War: British Society and the First World War (Cambridge, 2008). Quatrième de couverture:

What was it that the British people believed they were fighting for in 1914–18? This compelling history of the British home front during the First World War offers an entirely new account of how British society understood and endured the war. Drawing on official archives, memoirs, diaries and letters, Adrian Gregory sheds new light on the public reaction to the war, examining the role of propaganda and rumour in fostering patriotism and hatred of the enemy. He shows the importance of the ethic of volunteerism and the rhetoric of sacrifice in debates over where the burdens of war should fall as well as the influence of religious ideas on wartime culture. As the war drew to a climax and tensions about the distribution of sacrifices threatened to tear society apart, he shows how victory and the processes of commemoration helped create a fiction of a society united in grief.

Thomas Kristian Heebøll-Holm: « Lorsque l’agneau assaillait le lion: une attaque danoise sur l’Angleterre en 1138 »

Thomas Kristian Heebøll-Holm, de l’Université de Copenhague, a présenté sa communication “Lorsque l’agneau assaillait le lion: une attaque danoise sur l’Angleterre en 1138”.

Jeudi 9 octobre, Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421.

Podcast: