Laurent Curelly, “Edward Sexby et Killing Noe Murder : pour une histoire radicale de la Révolution anglaise?” (9 fév.)

Jeudi 9 février à 17h (D421 à Serpente)

Laurent Curelly (Mulhouse) : “Edward Sexby et Killing Noe Murder : pour une histoire radicale de la Révolution anglaise?”

Au printemps 1657 fut publié en Flandres et diffusé en Angleterre Killing Noe Murder, pamphlet sulfureux qui non seulement légitimait le recours au tyrannicide mais appelait spécifiquement à l’assassinat d’Oliver Cromwell, Protecteur d’Angleterre. L’objet de mon intervention est d’explorer les différentes facettes de ce texte, dont François-René de Chateaubriand écrivit qu’il s’agissait du « pamphlet le plus célèbre de son époque ». On étudiera les circonstances dans lesquelles il fut diffusé. On tentera également d’identifier son auteur. On se penchera enfin sur ses divers avatars anglais et français. Ces différentes pistes permettront de brosser un tableau de la Révolution anglaise des années 1640-1650, mais aussi de réfléchir aux lectures possibles de l’époque révolutionnaire qui l’enfanta et, ce faisant, de promouvoir une certaine histoire radicale des îles Britanniques.

David Armitage : ‘John Locke, Treaties, and the Two Treatises of Government’ (2 fév.)


Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, de 17h à 18h30, Salle D421 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).
 
Jeudi 2 février 2023 à 17h. David Armitage, Harvard/ Queen Mary University London: ‘John Locke, Treaties, and the Two Treatises of Government’


In the Two Treatises of Government (1690), John Locke offered an account of the separation of powers that was at once novel and almost entirely without influence. In chapter XII of the Second Treatise, he divided the powers of government conventionally between the legislative and the executive; unprecedentedly, the third power he enumerated was the “federative,” “the power of War and Peace, Leagues and Alliances, and all the Transactions, with all Persons and Communities without the Commonwealth”. Just why Locke highlighted the federative in this way—and then almost immediately collapsed it back into the executive power—presents a conundrum. This paper accounts for its prominence by tracing Locke’s engagement with treaties and treaty-making across his career, from his earliest appearance in print (with two poems celebrating a treaty), via his early diplomatic activities, his trafficking in treaties in France and the Netherlands, his notes on treaties in his journals and elsewhere, and his engagement with treaties as a colonial administrator in both the early 1670s and the late 1690s. It shows that Locke was deeply immersed in the burgeoning treaty culture of his time and that this hitherto unremarked interest shaped his peculiar and mostly unparalleled account of the royal prerogative as it stood on the eve of the Glorious Revolution. The paper concludes with reflections on how we might construe the relationship between Locke the diplomatic actor and student of treaties on the one hand and Locke the constitutional analyst and political theorist on the other. 


David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University and currently also an Honorary Senior Visiting Fellow at the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought, Queen Mary University of London. He is the author or editor of eighteen books, among them The Ideological Origins of the British Empire (2000), The Declaration of Independence: A Global History (2007), Foundations of Modern International Thought (2013) and Civil Wars: A History in Ideas (2017). He is currently completing an edition of John Locke’s colonial writings for the Clarendon Edition of the Works of John Locke and working on a new global history of Britain through its treaties and on a study of opera and international law.

Frank Rynne, ‘The Queen v. Parnell: A state trial and the  Irish Land War, 1879-82’ (26 jan. 2023)

The Queen v. Parnell: A state trial and the  Irish Land War, 1879-82

In nineteenth century Ireland, the end result of state trials was generally a foregone conclusion with conviction inevitable. State trials were political trials aimed at thwarting sedition or  political movements. Examples include the trial of Daniel O’Connell and others in 1844 and the Fenian Special Commission in 1866.  However, during the Irish Land War 1879-82 much had changed in Ireland. The case, The Queen v. Parnell and others was a more nuanced and complicated affair. From the outset the government had little confidence that they would secure convictions. The Irish Land War, 1879-82, resulted from a compact between the transnational Fenian movement and radical politicians in Ireland led by Charles Stuart Parnell. Central to the agitation, which ostensibly sought to gain peasant proprietorship for tenant farmers, was a national organisation, The Irish National Land League. Through the summer and autumn of 1880 Land League branches were founded throughout Ireland with mass meetings being held even in the remotest districts.

By autumn 1880 government appointees in Ireland were at loggerheads with Gladstone over his refusal to continence a coercion act for Ireland. While Gladstone resisted draconian measures, the Irish administration sought to appease  potentates who demanded habeas corpus suspension. It was clear to the Dublin Castle administration that should the trial fail to result in convictions Gladstone’s hand would be forced and he would have to introduce a coercion in Ireland. Thus, the state invested a vast amount of human and financial capital in pursuing the case.  

The documentation associated with the preparation for the trial and the evidence presented offers unique insights into the Irish National Land League’s rapid growth and also the nature of government in Ireland in the 1880s. The trial itself and its aftermath, which included the introduction of habeas corpus suspension in Ireland, illustrates the complexity of the Irish political situation during the Land War. It is also clear that the  leaders of the Irish Nationalist movement revelled in the prospect of a state trial for conspiracy; confident in acquittal and relishing such a platform for promoting their agenda. This paper will also examine the preparation for the trial and the remarkable throve of evidence the government compiled. It is clear that rather than being a further example of what nationalists might have concluded was the judicial suppression of a political movement, The Queen v. Parnell illustrates a symbiotic propaganda exercise by both the government in Ireland and the Land League.

Frank Rynne is a Senior Lecturer in British Studies and Irish history at CY Cergy Paris Université and a Visiting Research Fellow at The School of Modern History, Trinity College Dublin. He is a member of Agora (EA 7392) CY Cergy Paris Université and an associate member of Prismes (EA 4398) Université Sorbonne Nouvelle.

Philippa Carter, “Diseased brains and diseased souls in Reformation England” (15/12)

In Mystical Bedlam: The World of Madmen (1615), the Calvinist preacher Thomas Adams warned his readers that “there is a double madnesse, corporal and spirituall. That obsesseth the braine, this the heart”. Adams develops this extended simile throughout his sermons. Yet similes depend on points of difference as well as likeness. Focusing on the latter, Adams treats the difference between ‘corporal’ and ‘spiritual’ madness as though it were simply self-evident. For many of his contemporaries, however, it was not. Madness was troubling precisely because it seemed to afflict the whole person, including the rational faculties traditionally attributed to the soul. This paper explores English theologians’ attempts to disentangle soul, mind and brain in the aftermath of the Reformation. 


Philippa Carter is a historian of early modern medicine, natural philosophy, and religion. She is Assistant Professor in the History of Medicine and Health before 1800 at the History and Philosophy of Science Department, Cambridge, and a Fellow of Sidney Sussex College. She is currently working on a first monograph, provisionally entitled Phrenitis: Madness, Brain Disease and the Soul in Early Modern England.

Jane Humphries, ‘“The best job in the world”: breadwinning and the capture of household labour in 19th and early 20th-century British coal mining’ (8/12)

Jeudi 8 décembre 2022 à 17h (salle D421 à Serpente) :

Jane Humphries (Oxford / LSE ), ‘“The best job in the world”: breadwinning and the capture of household labour in 19th and early 20th-century British coal mining’

This paper, written with Ryah Thomas, explores the effects of gender inequality and women’s disempowerment in the context of historical coalmining. Across the US and Europe, ex-coalmining regions are characterized by significant deprivation. While there are many reasons for persistent problems, this study focuses on the restrictions imposed on women’s involvement in economic life. Families in mining communities exemplified the male breadwinner structure, in which men’s earnings supported wives and children who provided domestic services in return. This article, however, exposes a different reality of household economics and relations of dominance and subordination: All family members were integrated into the coalmining production process and the creation of profit. Women’s unpaid work did not simply provide domestic comfort; it transferred well-being from women and children to men and simultaneously contributed to the colliery companies’ profits. These findings revise accounts of mining families while providing insight into the intransigence of deprivation in ex-coalmining areas.

Joanne Paul, “Friendship, Kinship and Power: The House of Dudley in the Tudor Period” (1er déc.)

Joanne Paul, “Friendship, Kinship and Power: The House of Dudley in the Tudor Period”

Jeudi 1er décembre à 17h

In the Tudor period, power was acquired and maintained through the establishment not just of personal relationships with the monarch, but complex webs of alliances that made a dynasty – a ‘house’ – resilient against monarchical change. Many of these connections were formed with those whom would be thought of, by modern standards, distant family at best, but were decidedly considered ‘kin’ by Tudor standards. Expanding on the neo-revisionist studies of ‘family’ and ‘kinship’ in the early modern period, this talk will focus on the kinship connections formed by members of the Dudley family during the sixteenth century. It will argue that the functioning or failure of affective kinship ties played a significant part in the acquisition or loss of power to the House of Dudley in the Tudor period, drawing particular attention to affectionate male relationships, but also the ways in which the networks established by women were frequently essential to the re-establishment of the position of the family, following a breakdown in male kinship relationships. Drawing on research compiled for a public-history trade book, The House of Dudley, this talk will also experiment with methods of bridging (or eliminating, or exposing the fictionality of) the gap between ‘public’ and ‘academic’ histories.

Dr Joanne Paul is Honorary Senior Lecturer in Intellectual History at the University of Sussex, working on the intellectual, cultural and political histories of the Tudor and Renaissance periods. The House of Dudley (Penguin: Michael Joseph, 2022) is her third book and first trade book.

Frédérique Lachaud, Stéphane Jettot et Fabrice Bensimon : « Les ressources numériques en histoire britannique » 

Jeudi 24 novembre 2022 à 17h (salle D421 à Serpente) :

Frédérique Lachaud, Stéphane Jettot et Fabrice Bensimon (Sorbonne Université) : « Les ressources numériques en histoire britannique » 

Cette séance, à l’intention des étudiants de master et de doctorat, évoquera les principales ressources numériques en ligne en histoire britannique. Après une présentation générale, certaines collections en histoire médiévale, moderne et contemporaine seront plus particulièrement présentées.

Quentin Gasteuil : « Les travaillistes britanniques face aux questions coloniales durant l’entre-deux-guerres » (10 nov.)

Jeudi 10 novembre 2022 à 17h  : attention, séance sur Zoom uniquement (veuillez contacter l’équipe organisatrice pour le lien de connexion)

 

 

Quentin Gasteuil : « Les travaillistes britanniques face aux questions coloniales durant l’entre-deux-guerres »

 

Tout au long de l’entre-deux-guerres, les travaillistes britanniques sont confrontés aux questions liées à la domination coloniale exercée par le Royaume-Uni outre-mer : tentatives de gestion de l’Empire qui succèdent à sa phase d’expansion, projets de réformes ou encore contestations par les populations colonisées du sort qui leur est fait. Les occasions ne manquent pas pour que les membres du Labour Party, dont la place sur l’échiquier britannique a pris une importance nouvelle au lendemain de la Première Guerre mondiale, s’expriment et agissent vis-à-vis de ces enjeux. Selon quelles modalités le font-ils ? Qui sont ceux qui prennent ces sujets en main, personnellement et pour leur parti ? Par quelle pensée coloniale sont-ils guidés ? Durant cette intervention, c’est à un éclairage particulier de l’appréhension métropolitaine des questions coloniales qu’inviteront de tels questionnements, en même temps qu’ils donneront la possibilité de saisir certaines des spécificités du mouvement travailliste britannique.

Julia Laite, ‘Finding Lydia Harvey: reflections on global microhistory, creative non-fiction, and playing with scales in the The Disappearance of Lydia Harvey’ (27 oct.)

Jeudi 27 octobre 2022 à 17h (salle D421 à Serpente) :

 

Julia Laite (Birkbeck, University of London), ‘Finding Lydia Harvey: reflections on global microhistory, creative non-fiction, and playing with scales in the The Disappearance of Lydia Harvey

 

Lydia Harvey boarded a steamship in Wellington, New Zealand in January of 1910 bound for Argentina, where she was forced to sell sex in Buenos Aires by the people who had trafficked her there. They later brought her to London, where she was discovered by the Metropolitan Police and became the star witness in their case.  The Disappearance of Lydia Harvey traces this story, chases Lydia through the archive, and reveals the entangled lives of her traffickers, their prosecutors, and those who sold and used Lydia’s story for their own ends.

In this talk, Julia Laite will examine the digital methodologies that made this global microhistory possibly, explore the potential of creative non-fiction and storytelling in historical scholarship, and discuss the ethics and practicalities of rescuing someone from ‘the condescension of posterity’.

 

Julia Laite is Professor of History at the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology at Birkbeck, University of London. She researches and teaches on the history of women, crime, sexuality and migration in the nineteenth and twentieth century British world. Her latest book, The Disappearance of Lydia Harvey: A true story of sex, crime, and the meaning of justice (Profile, 2021) won the Crime Writer’s Association Gold Dagger for Non-Fiction and the Bert Roth Award for New Zealand Labour History.

Eliza Hartrich, ‘Understandings of Urban Citizenship in Late Medieval Ireland and Wales’ (20 oct.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, de 17h à 18h30, Salle D421 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

 

Jeudi 20 Octobre 2022 à 17h. Eliza Hartrich (University of East Anglia), ‘Understandings of Urban Citizenship in Late Medieval Ireland and Wales’
 

Résumé en français (English below)

 Ces dernières années, la citoyenneté urbaine pré-moderne est passée par une forme de renaissance historiographique. Maarten Prak, Miri Rubin, pour ne citer qu’eux, ont détaillé le processus par lequel des personnes devenaient des citoyens d’une ville, les privilèges qu’elles obtenaient, les tâches qu’elles devaient accomplir, et les discours qu’elles utilisaient – souvent dans le but de juxtaposer la nature localisée de la construction de la communauté locale pré-moderne, et les stratégies d’intégration/exclusion, aux cadres nationalistes pour la citoyenneté et l’immigration qui prévalent à la période moderne. Cette communication s’éloigne des exemples souvent cités des villes flamandes, hollandaises, françaises, allemandes, italiennes et anglaises pour examiner le fonctionnement de la citoyenneté urbaine dans les territoires moins urbanisés d’Irlande et du pays de Galles aux XIVe et XVe siècles, tous deux sous le contrôle assez lâche des rois d’Angleterre pendant cette période. En s’interrogeant sur l’identité de ceux qui devenaient citoyens des villes irlandaises et galloises et sur les contextes dans lesquelles ils invoquaient la citoyenneté, cette communication avance que la citoyenneté municipale impliquait bien plus que la simple appartenance à une communauté urbaine spécifique. On recherchait la citoyenneté d’une ville pour obtenir des privilèges commerciaux dans d’autres villes européennes, pour mettre en avant une identité ethnique spécifique, et pour consolider son pouvoir dans les campagnes et l’arrière-pays d’une ville, entre autres raisons variées qui n’étaient reliées que de manière tangentielle aux droits et aux obligations qu’on pouvait exercer dans sa propre ville. La citoyenneté urbaine pré-moderne était donc un statut tourné vers l’extérieur tout comme elle était un statut local : elle était destinée à enraciner son détenteur dans des hiérarchies sociales, politiques et culturelles extérieures à la ville, comme à indiquer sa place dans une communauté locale particulière.

Eliza HARTRICH est Lecturer en histoire de la fin du Moyen Âge à University of East Anglia. Elle a publié Politics and the Urban Sector in Fifteenth-Century England, 1413-1471 (Oxford University Press, 2019), ainsi que de nombreuses autres contributions sur la politique urbaine, l’archivage des documents, et les réseaux en Grande-Bretagne et en Irlande à la fin du Moyen Âge.

 

Abstract

 In recent years, pre-modern urban citizenship has experienced a historiographical renaissance of sorts. Maarten Prak, Miri Rubin, and others have detailed the processes by which people became citizens of a town, the privileges they obtained, the duties they were expected to perform, and the discourses they employed—often with the aim of juxtaposing the localised nature of pre-modern local community-building and strategies for integration/exclusion against the nationalist frameworks for citizenship and immigration that prevail in the modern period. This paper moves away from the more frequently-cited examples of Flemish, Dutch, French, German, Italian, and English towns to examine the operation of urban citizenship in the less-urbanised territories of Ireland and Wales in the 14th and 15th centuries, both of which were under the loose control of the kings of England during that period. By investigating who became citizens of Irish and Welsh towns and the contexts in which they invoked their citizenship, this paper argues that municipal citizenship conveyed much more than membership of a designated urban community. People sought citizenship of a town to gain trading privileges in other European towns, to present a particular ethnic identity, and to consolidate power in the countryside and hinterlands, among a variety of other reasons connected only tangentially to the rights and duties they would exercise in that specific town. Pre-modern urban citizenship was thus an outward-facing status as much as a local one, understood to embed the holder in social, political, and cultural hierarchies external to the town as well as enshrining their place within that particular local community.


Eliza HARTRICH is a Lecturer in Late Medieval History at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of Politics and the Urban Sector in Fifteenth-Century England, 1413-1471 (Oxford University Press, 2019), as well as of numerous other publications on urban politics, record-keeping, and networks in the later medieval Britain and Ireland

 

Bénédicte Miyamoto, “Satire & art market practices: the auction as visual trope in the eighteenth-century” (13 oct.)

Jeudi 13 octobre 2022 à 17h (salle D421 à Serpente) :

Bénédicte Miyamoto, “Satire & art market practices: the auction as visual trope in the eighteenth-century”

As auctions burst on the London scene, they became convenient shortcuts for satirists. Increasingly familiar with these urban spectacles, their actors and ‘props’, the public perceived auctions as highly volatile events rooted in consumer manipulation. Prints reverting to the tropes of the auction tended to satirize contracts between unequal parties and with power or information imbalance – from scandalous marriages to corrupt political representation. In turn, this reinforced the distrust towards connoisseurship, the collecting impulse, and the burgeoning art market.

Drawing from the collection of the British Museum and the Lewis Walpole Library, episodes of intense satire production (1730s, 1760s, and 1790s) can be identified, revealing the anxieties of the early modern to modern market transition, the intersections of the modern state and the marketplace, and the public disquiet at shifting valuations of taste and arbitration.

However, by confronting reputation to praxis, and investigating itemized bills and annotated catalogues, we gain insight into the art world’s business practices, explaining the increasing commercial success of auctions in the face of their enduring public disrepute.

Bénédicte MIYAMOTO (PhD, Université Paris Diderot) is an Associate Professor in British History at Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, and a scholar of the eighteenth-century British art market and artistic professions. She has published her research in Moving Pictures: Intra-European Trade in Images De Marchi and Raux, Brepols, 2014; Marketing Art in the British Isles, Gould and Mesplède, Ashgate, 2016; Art Crossing Borders: The International Art Market in the Age of Nation States, Baetens and Lyna, Brill, 2019, and London and the Emergence of a European Art Market, Huemer and Avery-Quash, Getty 2019, Art Markets, Agents and Collectors, Turpin and Bracken, 2021. She has co-edited Forms, Formats and the Circulation of Knowledge (LWW, Brill 2020) and Art & Migration (MUP, 2021).

Programme 2022-2023

Les séances ont lieu, sauf indication contraire, le jeudi de 17h à 18h30 à la Maison de la Recherche de Sorbonne Université (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421–  

Jeudi 13 octobre : Bénédicte Miyamoto (Sorbonne Nouvelle), ‘Satire and art market practices: the auction as visual trope in 18th century Britain’ 

Jeudi 20 octobre : Eliza Hartrich (Norwich), ‘Understandings of urban citizenship in late medieval Ireland and Wales’ 

Jeudi 27 octobre : Julia Laite (Birkbeck, University of London), autour de son livre, The Disappearance of Lydia Harvey. A True Story of Sex, Crime and the Meaning of Justice (Profile, 2020)

Jeudi 10 novembre : Quentin Gasteuil : « Les travaillistes britanniques face aux questions coloniales durant l’entre-deux-guerres »

Jeudi 17 novembre : Samraghni Bonnerjee (Northumbria University), ‘”Game and bigger game”: The Settler Soldier, the Non-Human, and the First World War’

Jeudi 24 novembre : Frédérique Lachaud, Stéphane Jettot et Fabrice Bensimon (Sorbonne Université) : « Les ressources numériques en histoire britannique » (séance à destination des étudiants)

Jeudi 1er décembre : Joanne Paul (Sussex), ‘Friendship, Kinship and Power: The House of Dudley in the Tudor Period’

Jeudi 8 décembre : Jane Humphries (Oxford) : ‘The best job in the world? Breadwinning and the capture of household labour in 19th and early 20th century British coal mining’

Jeudi 15 décembre : Philippa Carter (Cambridge) : ‘Diseased brains and diseased souls in Reformation England’

Jeudi 26 janvier 2023 : Sarah Cusk (Oxford), ‘Building a library in early 16th century Oxford: a survey of printed books from the libraries of four English humanists’

Jeudi 2 février : David Armitage (Harvard), ‘John Locke, Treaties, and the Two Treatises of Government’

Jeudi 9 février : Laurent Curelly (Mulhouse) : ‘Edward Sexby et Killing Noe Murder: pour une histoire radicale de la Révolution anglaise? » :

Jeudi 16 février : Sally Holloway (Oxford),  ‘Food, Family, and Feeling: Edible Gifts and the Making of Marriage in Georgian England’:

Jeudi 23 février : Charles West (Sheffield), ‘The Lost Kingdom: a British perspective on the collapse of Lotharingia’

Jeudi 9 mars : Muriel Pécastaing-Boissière (Sorbonne Université), « Les biographies de Giordano Bruno par Annie Besant (publiées entre 1876 et 1911) : entre stratégie de justification et autobiographie occulte »

Jeudi 16 mars : Rémy Duthille (Bordeaux) : « Les Britanniques au miroir des révolutions de 1830 »

Jeudi 23 mars : Tom Stammers (Durham): ‘Philippe, comte de Paris and the Orleans family in Exile after 1848: Liberalism, Collecting and Empire’

Jeudi 30 mars : Florence Petroff (La Rochelle) : « La question américaine en Écosse : penser la britannicité à l’échelle de l’empire dans les années 1770 »

Jeudi 6 avril : Mikko Toivanen (Varsovie) : ‘Tropical travels, colonial culture: early British tourism in nineteenth-century Southeast Asia’

Jeudi 13 avril : William Ashworth (Liverpool) : ‘The Early Chemical Industry in North West England and Its Legacy’

Jeudi 20 avril : Greg Claeys (Royal Holloway, London), ‘Utopianism for a Dying Planet: Some British Contexts’

Jeudi 11 mai : Charles-Edouard Levillain (Université de Paris Cité), « Écrire une biographie de Guillaume III d’Orange au XXIe siècle »

                                 

Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. Les enregistrements de la plupart des communications sont ensuite disponibles sur la chaine YouTube du séminaire :  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCveumFeGDtmJP8GTG3S8DOQ

LAURA KING : ‘The School Case of Poor Harold: Families’ multi-generational remembrance of deceased children in twentieth-century England’ (12 mai)

Jeudi 12 mai de 17h à 18h30 – Salle D040 à Serpente

 

LAURA KING (Leeds) : ‘The School Case of Poor Harold: Families’ multi-generational remembrance of deceased children in twentieth-century England’

 

‘Poor Harold’ died in 1931, aged nearly eleven, and left behind a school case. This paper examines the story of this ‘ordinary’ boy and his family, who have chosen to preserve his memory through the keeping of this object. The paper examines the case itself, and the story associated with it, as told by Harold’s niece Maureen. In doing so, the article explores remembrance culture in interwar England and inter-generational memory cultures since, focusing on emotional practices, attitudes to death, cross-generational family identities, and changing engagement with religion and faith.

 

Latest monograph : Family Men: Fatherhood and Masculinity in Britain, c.1914-1960 (Oxford University Press, 2015)

 

Contact : Stéphane Jettot jettot@yahoo.com



Emma Griffin, autour de son livre “Bread Winner. An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy” (21/04)

Séminaire franco-britannique d’histoire

https://sfbh.hypotheses.org/

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30

(La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire ).

 Jeudi 21 avril 2022 à 17h: Emma Griffin (East Anglia), autour de son livre Bread Winner. An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale University Press, 2020)

Abstract

Nineteenth century Britain saw remarkable economic growth and a rise in real wages. But not everyone shared in the nation’s wealth. Unable to earn a sufficient income themselves, working-class women were reliant on the ‘breadwinner wage’ of their husbands. When income failed, or was denied or squandered by errant men, families could be plunged into desperate poverty from which there was no escape.
Emma Griffin unlocks the homes of Victorian England to examine the lives – and finances – of the people who lived there. Drawing on over 600 working-class autobiographies, including more than 200 written by women, Bread Winner changes our understanding of daily life in Victorian Britain.

Emma Griffin is a Professor of Modern British History at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of several books, the editor of the Historical Journal, and the President of the Royal Historical Society.