Ann Towns: « Globalizing the Exclusion of Women from Politics in the Long Nineteenth Century »

Ann Towns de l’Université de Göteborg, présentera sa communication « Globalizing the Exclusion of Women from Politics in the Long Nineteenth Century » le jeudi 6 octobre, de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Résumé :

This seminar focuses on the importance of gender in the British-dominated nineteenth century society of states. More specifically, the seminar pulls together scholarship in history to provide a grand narrative – a macro-historical account — of the centrality of gender in the development and globalization of state polities between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. The talk first focuses on the diverse ways in which gender was organized in polities around the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth century – some polities included female rule, whereas others were male dominated. The talk then shows that this diversity gave way to more uniform exclusion of women, as the barring of female political power became an informal standard of civilization in international society, embedded in British and French colonialism and scientific ideas. The expansion of the ideas and practices of British-dominated international society thus helped spread and standardize male rule, displacing gender arrangements that empowered women politically in Africa, Native America and Asia. This history is particularly important in light of contemporary assumptions about the Anglo-American origins of the political empowerment of women.

 

Laura Tabili: « ‘To Keep My Living for Time Being’: Strategies of Makeshift in Interwar Britain »

Laura Tabili, de l’Université d’Arizona, présentera sa communication « ‘To Keep My Living for Time Being’: Strategies of Makeshift in Interwar Britain » le jeudi 17 mai, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

La séance sera suivie d’un pot de fin d’année, vers 19h.

Discutant: Yann Béliard

Résumé:
The paper will reconstruct patterns of migration, work and settlement among migrants from the colonies to Britain, focusing on the 1920s and 1930s. Migration from colonies to metropoles partook of specific power relations and economic arrangements, yet also formed part of a broader and unprecedented population mobility between 1800 and 1950. Although scholars are aware that this population moved to and from, into and around Britain and the North Sea and Atlantic littoral, we still know little about where they lived, how much they mixed and married with local people, and the extent to which these patterns persisted or altered after the second world war. Analyzing records of several hundred individuals enables systematically reconstructing their places of origin, time, place and manner of arrival in Britain, patterns of dispersal and settlement within Britain, their strategies of getting a living and their travels within and beyond Britain.
Feminist historians have described how women compensated for their disadvantage in labor markets while reconciling social labor with domestic responsibilities through “economies of makeshift” involving paid and unpaid labor within and outside the household, as well as pawning, scrounging and semi-legal activities. This paper specifically describes how colonized migrants in Britain similarly compensated for their limited and constrained occupational choices by moving from job to job, town to town, and occupation to occupation.

Laurence Sterritt: “Illness, Death and Beyond: The Body as Witness in Seventeenth-Century English Convents”

Laurence Sterritt, de l’Université d’Aix-Marseille, présentera sa communication « Illness, Death and Beyond: The Body as Witness in Seventeenth-Century English Convents” le jeudi 14 avril, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutante: Anne-Marie Miller Blaise

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Résumé:
The obituaries which describe the last illnesses and dying hours of religious women have often been described as formulaic and, therefore, delicate historical sources. Yet, these narratives yield much information about what appeared important to both writers and convents, in the construction of their communal records. By telling of the illness and death of individuals in certain ways, obituaries partook of the development of communal memory and corporate identity. This was particularly important in the context of the English convents which were founded on the Continent in the seventeenth century. This paper will approach the topic through an analysis of the Benedictine Order, whose rich archives provide a glimpse into the interface between the personal and the collective experience of death, and throw light upon aspects of the construction of a Catholic identity in exile.

Lucy Delap: « Men, women’s liberation and guilt c. 1970-1990: thoughts on the history of emotions »

Lucy Delap, de l’Université de Cambridge, présentera sa communication « Men, women’s liberation and guilt c. 1970-1990: thoughts on the history of emotions » le jeudi 24 mars de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante: Anne Besnault-Lévita, de l’Université de Rouen

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Feminism posed powerful political and emotional challenges to progressive men in the 1970s and 1980s. In this paper, Lucy Delap investigates politically and personally motivated attempts to ‘feel differently’ by men in Britain who identified as ‘anti-sexist’ and aligned themselves with the Women’s Liberation Movement. This rescripting of emotions was a central way in which both men and women felt that gender change might be achieved. Through exploring emotions of guilt and shame, she will discuss the concept of the male gaze, and its political and emotional impact on progressive men. Methodologically, this raises the question of how to historicise inner states which may leave few traces. Oral history sources can provide us with extraordinarily rich sources in thinking about emotions. However, innovative and interdisciplinary approaches are needed to read affects as entities that exceed what can be said, and to uncover the emotional lexicon of gesture and gaze.

Kathryn Gleadle, « Juvenile agency and the making of political elites: subversion and the childhood archive of Eva Knatchbull-Hugessen (1861-95) »

Kathryn Gleadle, de l’Université d’Oxford, présentera sa communication « Juvenile agency and the making of political elites:  subversion and the childhood archive of Eva Knatchbull-Hugessen (1861-95) » le jeudi 4 février de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante : Myriam Boussahba-Bravard (Paris-Diderot)

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

Résumé:

The nineteenth century was the age of writing and Victorians were avid archivists of their own words. What is especially striking is the extent to which juvenile material was incorporated within family collections. As Sanchez-Eppler has observed [2005], the universality and temporary nature of childhood makes it an especially valuable tool with which to probe the construction of class and identity. Juvenile texts enable us to explore how these subjectivities were expressed and reaffirmed in familial manuscript practices. In so doing it will consider how children themselves were active participants in the creation of family and literary cultures. In the process, the young not only passively reproduced, but also questioned, mimicked and satirised family norms. Lire la suite

Anna Jenkin: « Condamner, imprimer et lire la meurtrière au 18e siècle à Londres et à Paris »

Anna Jenkin, de l’Université de Sheffield, présentera sa communication « Condamner, imprimer et lire la meurtrière au 18e siècle à Londres et à Paris » le jeudi 12 février, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Résumé:

It has been long accepted that women who committed murder in early modern Europe were treated differently from men both in the judicial system and in print culture because the act of murder committed by a woman was more transgressive and subversive than that committed by a man. But this close analysis of the judicial records of London and Paris and the print culture generated around particular cases of female-perpetrated murder will show that this was not the case. Judicially, female-perpetrated murder had low conviction rates in both cities and concern only really focused upon particular kinds of murderesses. In print culture generally cases of female perpetrated murder did not attract any interest at all, yet a very few cases attracted extraordinary levels of print and imaginative engagement. Gender cannot therefore be the only factor in understanding perceptions of the murderess for this this time period, and through the study of Parisian and London reactions to such women we can learn a great more about the specific environments of these two European environments during a period of dramatic change.

Dominique Kalifa et Frédéric Regard: « Féminisme et prostitution dans l’Angleterre des années 1870 et 1880 »

Dominique Kalifa et Frédéric Regard ouvreront une discussion autour de Féminisme et prostitution dans l’Angleterre du XIXe siècle : la croisade de Josephine Butler , textes réunis et présentés par Frédéric Regard, en collaboration avec Florence Marie et Sylvie Regard, Lyon, ENS Editions, 2013 ; et de : William Thomas Stead, Pucelles à vendre. Londres 1885, postface de Dominique Kalifa, Paris, Alma, 2013. La séance aura lieu le jeudi 18 décembre de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

 

Résumé:

L’Anglaise Josephine Butler (1828-1906) fait partie des grandes oubliées de l’histoire du féminisme. C’est elle, pourtant, qui précipita au XIXe siècle  une révolution du regard porté sur la prostitution, en fondant en 1869 la Ladies National Association afin d’obtenir l’abrogation des « Lois sur les maladies contagieuses ». Butler fut la première à voir dans la prostituée non plus une perverse, mais la victime d’un système d’exploitation. Lorsque les Lois furent finalement abrogées en 1886, c’est tout le rapport au corps de la femme qui avait été redéfini. Lire la suite

Christine Kinealy, “Women and the Great Irish Famine”

Christine Kinealy de Quinnipiac University (Connecticut) présentera sa communication “Women and the Great Irish Famine” le jeudi 4 décembre. Exceptionnellement, cette séance aura lieu de 18h à 20h.

Le nombre de places étant limité, l’inscription est obligatoire (et gratuite): sur cette page Doodle. Le podcast de la communication sera rendu disponible dès que possible par un lien dans ce billet.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées.

Marie Terrier: « The Link (1888) : l’expérience d’Annie Besant et de W.T. Stead entre socialisme et nouveau journalisme »

Marie Terrier, de l’Université de Paris III, présentera sa communication « The Link (1888) : l’expérience d’Annie Besant et de W.T. Stead entre socialisme et nouveau journalisme », le 6 novembre, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Discutante: Ophélie Siméon (Collège de France).

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR.

Résumé:

Chacun à leur manière, Annie Besant (1847-1933) et William Thomas Stead (1849-1912) font partie des personnages incontournables du Londres radical et socialiste de la fin du XIXe siècle. Leurs activités et leurs écrits ont fait l’objet de nombreuses études. Pourtant, Annie Besant, la socialiste militante, et W.T. Stead, le journaliste d’investigation radical, sont rarement étudiés simultanément Lire la suite