Luke O’Sullivan: « Theory TV: The Political Documentaries of Adam Curtis » (13/10)

Luke O’Sullivan, de la National University of Singapore, professeur invité à Sciences-Po St Germain en Laye (Univ. de Cergy-Pontoise), présentera sa communication “Theory TV: The Political Documentaries of Adam Curtis” le jeudi 13 octobre, de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Résumé :

“Adam Curtis (b.1955) is a British film-maker who has worked for the BBC since the early 1980s.  Over the course of three decades he has built up an impressive body of work on twentieth century history and politics which has yet to be noticed by an academic audience. This is despite the fact that he has regularly addressed the impact on politics and society of the ideas of a long list of thinkers that includes Sigmund Freud, Walter Lipmann, Leo Strauss, Friedrich Hayek, Ayn Rand, Sayid Qutb, John von Neumann, James Buchanan, Franz Fanon, John Nash, Isaiah Berlin, and Richard Dawkins, to name only some of the best-known. This paper offers an introduction to his films, and investigates the pros and cons of attempting to tackle major historical and philosophical themes in the televisual documentary format. It argues that while Curtis has many original observations to make about the fate of contemporary Britain (and of Western modernity) more generally, the only way to truly appreciate his contribution is, ironically, to turn his work back into text.”
The following documentaries can be watched prior to the conference: Century of the Self; All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace; The Power of Nightmares; and The Trap. All of them are on YouTube.

Discutante: Karine Chambefort, U. Paris-Est Créteil

Laurence Sterritt: “Illness, Death and Beyond: The Body as Witness in Seventeenth-Century English Convents”

Laurence Sterritt, de l’Université d’Aix-Marseille, présentera sa communication « Illness, Death and Beyond: The Body as Witness in Seventeenth-Century English Convents” le jeudi 14 avril, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutante: Anne-Marie Miller Blaise

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Résumé:
The obituaries which describe the last illnesses and dying hours of religious women have often been described as formulaic and, therefore, delicate historical sources. Yet, these narratives yield much information about what appeared important to both writers and convents, in the construction of their communal records. By telling of the illness and death of individuals in certain ways, obituaries partook of the development of communal memory and corporate identity. This was particularly important in the context of the English convents which were founded on the Continent in the seventeenth century. This paper will approach the topic through an analysis of the Benedictine Order, whose rich archives provide a glimpse into the interface between the personal and the collective experience of death, and throw light upon aspects of the construction of a Catholic identity in exile.

Lucy Delap: « Men, women’s liberation and guilt c. 1970-1990: thoughts on the history of emotions »

Lucy Delap, de l’Université de Cambridge, présentera sa communication « Men, women’s liberation and guilt c. 1970-1990: thoughts on the history of emotions » le jeudi 24 mars de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante: Anne Besnault-Lévita, de l’Université de Rouen

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Feminism posed powerful political and emotional challenges to progressive men in the 1970s and 1980s. In this paper, Lucy Delap investigates politically and personally motivated attempts to ‘feel differently’ by men in Britain who identified as ‘anti-sexist’ and aligned themselves with the Women’s Liberation Movement. This rescripting of emotions was a central way in which both men and women felt that gender change might be achieved. Through exploring emotions of guilt and shame, she will discuss the concept of the male gaze, and its political and emotional impact on progressive men. Methodologically, this raises the question of how to historicise inner states which may leave few traces. Oral history sources can provide us with extraordinarily rich sources in thinking about emotions. However, innovative and interdisciplinary approaches are needed to read affects as entities that exceed what can be said, and to uncover the emotional lexicon of gesture and gaze.

Selina Todd, autour de son livre The People: The Rise and Fall of the Working Class, 1910-2010

Selina Todd, de l’Université d’Oxford, ouvrira une discussion autour de son livre The People: The Rise and Fall of the Working Class, 1910-2010 (London, John Murray, 2014) le jeudi 17 mars de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutant: Yann Béliard de l’Université Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Présentation de l’éditeur : ‘There was nothing extraordinary about my childhood or background. And yet I looked in vain for any aspect of my family’s story when I went to university to read history, and continued to search fruitlessly for it throughout the next decade. Eventually I realised I would have to write this history myself.’

What was it really like to live through the twentieth century? In 1910 three-quarters of the population were working class, but their story has been ignored until now. Based on the first-person accounts of servants, factory workers, miners and housewives, award-winning historian Selina Todd reveals an unexpected Britain where cinema audiences shook their fists at footage of Winston Churchill, communities supported strikers and pools winners (like Viv Nicholson) refused to become respectable. Charting the rise of the working class, through two world wars to their fall in Thatcher’s Britain and today, Todd tells their story for the first time, in their own words. Uncovering a huge hidden swathe of Britain’s past, The People is the vivid history of a revolutionary century and the people who really made Britain great.

Kathryn Gleadle, « Juvenile agency and the making of political elites: subversion and the childhood archive of Eva Knatchbull-Hugessen (1861-95) »

Kathryn Gleadle, de l’Université d’Oxford, présentera sa communication « Juvenile agency and the making of political elites:  subversion and the childhood archive of Eva Knatchbull-Hugessen (1861-95) » le jeudi 4 février de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante : Myriam Boussahba-Bravard (Paris-Diderot)

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

Résumé:

The nineteenth century was the age of writing and Victorians were avid archivists of their own words. What is especially striking is the extent to which juvenile material was incorporated within family collections. As Sanchez-Eppler has observed [2005], the universality and temporary nature of childhood makes it an especially valuable tool with which to probe the construction of class and identity. Juvenile texts enable us to explore how these subjectivities were expressed and reaffirmed in familial manuscript practices. In so doing it will consider how children themselves were active participants in the creation of family and literary cultures. In the process, the young not only passively reproduced, but also questioned, mimicked and satirised family norms. Lire la suite

Mathilde Bertrand: « Le mouvement community photography dans les années 1970 et 1980: quelle approche méthodologique pour l’histoire des pratiques photographiques militantes? »

Mathilde Bertrand, de l’université Bordeaux-Montaigne, présentera sa communication « Le mouvement community photography dans les années 1970 et 1980 : quelle approche méthodologique pour l’histoire des pratiques photographiques militantes? » le jeudi 7 janvier de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutant: John Mullen , de l’université de Rouen

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Le mouvement community photography apparaît en Angleterre à la fin des années soixante. Il se développe dans le sillage de la contre-culture, dont il adopte la posture contestataire et le projet culturel alternatif. Alors que la photographie entre dans un processus de légitimation artistique, le mouvement engage une réflexion critique et politique sur les usages sociaux du médium. Il se façonne également selon des principes et objectifs proches du mouvement community action, activisme grassroots qui se développe dans les zones urbaines défavorisées et mobilise un discours radical d’émancipation et de participation collective de la population à l’échelle locale. Lire la suite

Anne-Julie Etter: « ‘An object of desirable achievement’ : l’East India Company et la conservation des monuments en Inde (fin du 18e siècle – milieu du 19e siècle) »

Anne-Julie Etter, de l’Université Cergy-Pontoise, présentera sa communication « ‘An object of desirable achievement’ : l’East India Company et la conservation des monuments en Inde (fin du 18e siècle – milieu du 19e siècle) » le jeudi 17 décembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Vers 19h, la séance sera suivie d’un pot de fin d’année, au 3e étage de la Maison de la Recherche.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante: Isabelle Gadoin, de l’Université de Poitiers.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Cette présentation étudie les acteurs et les modalités de la conservation des monuments indiens de la fin du xviiie siècle aux années 1850, en mettant l’accent sur le rôle de l’East India Company, qui administre les possessions britanniques en Inde pendant le premier siècle colonial. Les initiatives de l’East India Company s’inscrivent en continuité avec les pratiques antérieures, qui relèvent d’un entretien régulier des édifices auquel participent le pouvoir souverain et les populations. Alors que la plupart des travaux sur le thème de la conservation en Inde traitent de la fin du xixe siècle et du xxe siècle à partir d’un examen de la législation sur les monuments historiques, la période du Company Raj attire l’attention sur les pratiques et les concepts indigènes et éclaire d’un jour nouveau les interactions entre métropole et colonie dans le domaine patrimonial.

Laurence Dubois: « “Such cheerful scenes” : loisirs et festivités à l’Asile de Hanwell, ou le divertissement au cœur du dispositif de soins (1839-1852) »

Laurence Dubois, de l’Université Paris X-Nanterre et Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle, présentera sa communication ““Such cheerful scenes” : loisirs et festivités à l’Asile de Hanwell, ou le divertissement au cœur du dispositif de soins (1839-1852)” le jeudi 10 décembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutante: Jacqueline Carroy, de l’EHESS.

Podcast ci-dessous ou sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Le docteur John Conolly (1794-1866) est l’une des figures emblématiques de la psychiatrie victorienne, et son nom reste à jamais associé au non restraint, cette innovation thérapeutique qui va progressivement devenir la norme dans les asiles anglais à partir des années 1840. Conolly met en place une politique d’abandon total des moyens de contention mécanique dans  le traitement des aliénés dès sa nomination à la tête de l’Asile de Hanwell en juin 1839, un asile public pour aliénés indigents, situé dans la banlieue ouest de Londres. Si elle s’inspire d’expériences similaires menées à l’asile Quaker d’York (The Retreat ) ou bien encore  à l’asile de Lincoln, il s’agit cependant d’une expérience inédite par son ampleur car plus de 1000 patients en bénéficient. Le non restraint ne se limite pas à rendre les patients libres de leurs mouvements, mais implique également une toute nouvelle approche dans la politique de soins. La particularité de cette prise en charge thérapeutique est de faire porter tous les efforts sur la qualité de l’environnement et du mode de vie des patients, dans une logique de soins innovante que l’on nommerait aujourd’hui « thérapie d’occupation ». Lire la suite

Aude Mairey, « La fabrique de l’anglais (1350-1470) »

Aude Mairey, du CNRS, présentera sa communication “La fabrique de l’anglais (1350-1470)” le jeudi 19 novembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutant: Jean-Philippe Genet, de l’université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé :

Aux xive et xve siècles, se forge en Angleterre une culture laïque spécifique, dont la production foisonnante en langue anglaise constitue l’une des manifestations majeures. Cette langue acquiert alors les caractéristiques d’une langue littéraire, intellectuelle et politique, en relation avec le latin, langue savante par excellence, et avec le français, langue des élites laïques depuis la conquête de Guillaume de Normandie en 1066. Ces transformations soulèvent des enjeux essentiels dans le cadre des évolutions plus générales de l’Angleterre à la fin du Moyen Âge, en particulier à propos des rapports de pouvoir, de la constitution d’une communauté anglaise et des liens des individus à cette communauté, des perceptions des relations entre les groupes sociaux (clercs compris), mais aussi des structures du savoir dans un pays dont on a longtemps considéré qu’il resta au xve siècle à l’écart de la Renaissance. Lire la suite

Franziska Heimburger: « Mésentente Cordiale? Languages in the Allied Coalition on the Western Front of the First World War »

Franziska Heimburger, de l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne, présentera sa communication « Mésentente Cordiale? Languages in the Allied Coalition on the Western Front of the First World War » le jeudi 22 octobre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutant : André Loez (historien de la grande guerre, membre du Crid 14-18, professeur en classes préparatoires)

Podcast ci-dessous ou sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Previous scholarship on the Allied coalition during the First World War has tended to stress the misunderstandings and distrust between the individuals representing their countries at high command level. There is an unexplained tension between this mésentente and the durable nature of the coalition and eventual victory of the French, British and Americans on the Western Front which leaves the lower echelons underexplored. In a joint and linked study of language practice and military logistics we can write a history which tells us both how these exchanges were possible and to what extent they contributed to the Allies’ victory. Official and private archival material enables us both to read traces of language from the perspective of the history of international exchanges and also to understand choices in military logistics from the point of view of interpreting and translation studies. Lire la suite

Daniel Woolf: « The Organization and Experience of Time in Early Modern England »

Daniel Woolf, de Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, présentera sa communication « The Organization and Experience of Time in Early Modern England«  le jeudi 8 octobre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

La séance est assurée en collaboration avec l’UFR GHES de l’Université Paris-Diderot et l’Inalco.

Berny Sèbe autour de son livre Heroic Imperialists in Africa

Berny Sèbe, de l’Université de Birmingham, ouvrira une discussion autour de son livre Heroic Imperialists in Africa. The Promotion of British and French Colonial Heroes, 1870–1939 (Manchester, 2013), le jeudi 7 mai, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

Résumé:

De David Livingstone à Charles de Foucauld, de Pierre Savorgnan de Brazza au Général Gordon, du « sirdar » Kitchener à Jean-Baptiste Marchand, les porte-drapeaux de la « mission civilisatrice », munis de leur Bible ou de leur fusil – parfois des deux, ont souvent été fêtés avec enthousiasme dans leurs pays. Leurs « exploits » ont fait la une des journaux, inspirant des générations de biographes, peintres et cinéastes. Lire la suite

Graham Parry: « The Many Pasts of Britain: the Rise of Antiquarian Studies in the 17th Century »

Graham Parry, de la Society of Antiquaries of London, présentera sa communication « The Many Pasts of Britain: the Rise of Antiquarian Studies in the 17th Century » le jeudi 2 avril, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

Résumé:

As new models of scholarship entered England in the middle of Elizabeth’s reign, scholars began to take a more critical approach to the origins of Britain.  Who were the ancestors of the English? Where did they come from? What language did they speak? What was their way of life, their religious beliefs? The traditional views of the British past became discredited, as more systematic methods of enquiry were introduced. After William Camden’s seminal book ‘Britannia’ was published in 1586, a new type of scholar began to emerge: the antiquary.  The achievements of men such as John Selden, James Ussher, William Dugdale and John Aubrey will be briefly assessed, and their (often surprising) discoveries will be presented, for the enjoyment of a modern audience.

Gopalan Balachandran, « Coolies to Cosmopolitans: the Global World of Indian Seafarers, c. 1870-1945 »

Gopalan Balachandran du Graduate Institute de Genève présentera sa communication « Coolies to Cosmopolitans: the Global World of Indian Seafarers, c. 1870-1945 » le jeudi 12 mars, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous ou sur le site de l’IHR.

 

Résumé:

This talk discusses some key aspects of my research on Indian seafarers in international shipping in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Numbering in the tens of thousands and sailing round the world on British, American, and other merchant ships, seafarers were India’s, and possibly the world’s, first global workers. Working on decks, and in engine rooms, kitchens, and cabins of luxury liners and tramps, in times of peace these maritime workers were an invisible but indispensable part of the world forming at the time, not only through the vessels they sailed and the cargoes and passengers these carried, but also their own lives afloat and ashore. When Britain went to war, they made a crucial difference for it between life and death, survival and starvation, victory and defeat.

Lire la suite

Carolyn Steedman, « Writing a writer: Joseph Woolley, Sir Gervase Clifton, and the Law »

Carolyn Steedman, de l’université de Warwick, présentera sa communication « Writing a writer:  Joseph Woolley, Sir Gervase Clifton, and the Law », autour de son ouvrage, An Everyday Life in the English Working Class. Work, Self and Sociability in the Early Nineteenth Century (Cambridge, 2013), le jeudi 5 février à 17h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

 

Résumé:

This book concerns two men, a stockingmaker and a magistrate, who both lived in a small English village at the turn of the nineteenth century. It focuses on Joseph Woolley the stockingmaker, on his way of seeing and writing the world around him, and on the activities of magistrate Sir Gervase Clifton, administering justice from his country house Clifton Hall. Using Woolley’s voluminous diaries and Clifton’s magistrate records, Carolyn Steedman gives us a unique and fascinating account of working-class living and loving, and getting and spending. Through Woolley and his thoughts on reading and drinking, sex, the law and social relations, she challenges traditional accounts which she argues have overstated the importance of work to the working man’s understanding of himself, as a creature of time, place and society. She shows instead that, for men like Woolley, law and fiction were just as critical as work in framing everyday life.