Sophie Ambler: « Magna Carta and the Statute of Pamiers »

Sophie Ambler, du Magna Carta Project, présentera sa communication « Magna Carta and the Statue of Pamiers » le jeudi 25 février, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Discutante : Elisabeth Lalou, de l’Université de Rouen.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Résumé:

It has long been acknowledged that Magna Carta – now an iconic document in English/British history – was one of several great charters or statutes issued by European rulers in the thirteenth century. Little has been done, though, to compare these documents in order to find out what their differences and similarities can tell us about rulership in thirteenth-century Europe. This paper will focus on two documents – King John’s Magna Carta of 1215 and the Statute of Pamiers, issued in 1212 by Simon de Montfort, leader of the Albigensian Crusade – looking at the context in which they were issued, and how they were used by those who granted them to broadcast a message about their rule.  

Mark Knights: « Anti-corruption in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-century Britain »

Mark Knights , de l’Université de Warwick, présentera sa communication « Anti-corruption in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-century Britain » le jeudi 18 février, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Résumé:

This paper examines anti-corruption in Britain and its colonies, from the late sixteenth century reformation to the reform movements of the nineteenth century (when the term ‘anti-corruption’ was coined). There are a number of reasons why it makes sense to treat the topic across a period of 250 years. Lire la suite

Sam Turner, « The seventh-century monasteries of Wearmouth-Jarrow and the bones of the Northumbrian landscape »

Sam Turner, de l’Université de Newcastle, présentera sa communication « The seventh-century monasteries of Wearmouth-Jarrow and the bones of the Northumbrian landscape » le jeudi 11 février, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante :Elisabeth Lorans de l’Université de Tours

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Most historical accounts of Anglo-Saxon Northumbria focus on religious conversion as a key driving force in 7th-century social change. As a counterpoint to this approach, I suggest that the examination of certain ‘technologies’ can help explain more specifically what changed, why it changed and how change was effected. I will examine these themes with reference to the famous monasteries of Wearmouth and Jarrow, where I have undertaken new research in collaboration with a team of colleagues. Lire la suite