Gopalan Balachandran, « Coolies to Cosmopolitans: the Global World of Indian Seafarers, c. 1870-1945 »

Gopalan Balachandran du Graduate Institute de Genève présentera sa communication « Coolies to Cosmopolitans: the Global World of Indian Seafarers, c. 1870-1945 » le jeudi 12 mars, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous ou sur le site de l’IHR.

 

Résumé:

This talk discusses some key aspects of my research on Indian seafarers in international shipping in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Numbering in the tens of thousands and sailing round the world on British, American, and other merchant ships, seafarers were India’s, and possibly the world’s, first global workers. Working on decks, and in engine rooms, kitchens, and cabins of luxury liners and tramps, in times of peace these maritime workers were an invisible but indispensable part of the world forming at the time, not only through the vessels they sailed and the cargoes and passengers these carried, but also their own lives afloat and ashore. When Britain went to war, they made a crucial difference for it between life and death, survival and starvation, victory and defeat.

Lire la suite

Stefan Collini: « The identity of intellectual history »

La Maison de la recherche de Paris IV étant fermée ce jeudi en raison d’un mouvement de grève des personnels, la séance avec Stefan Collini (“The Identity of Intellectual History”) aura lieu à 17h30 la Bibliothèque de l’UFR d’anglais de Paris IV, à la Sorbonne (54 rue Saint-Jacques, Paris 5e), escalier G, 2e étage.

 

Stefan Collini, de l’Université de Cambridge, présentera sa communication “The identity of intellectual history” le jeudi 5 mars, de 17h30 à 19h30. La séance est organisée en partenariat avec le PRI îles Britanniques EHESS- Paris 7.

Discutantes: Clarisse Berthezène et Emmanuelle de Champs.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Résumé:

In this lecture, Stefan Collini argues that intellectual history should not be understood as having a fixed or theoretically determined identity. Work in a variety of idioms has contributed to its development and should continue to do so. In addition, it is particularly important that intellectual historians should learn to attend to the literary or formal properties of the texts they study, not just to their propositional content. Work on the intellectual history of recent centuries is bound to engage with question of the development of academic disciplines, and, through the inevitably relativising effect of such work, intellectual historians are drawn into the academic public sphere.

Adrian Gregory: « The Last War: Further reflections on Britain and the Great War »

Adrian Gregory, de Pembroke College, Oxford, présentera sa communication « The Last War: Further reflections on Britain and the Great War » le jeudi 19 février, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Discutante: Franziska Heimburger

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de l’IHR:

 

Adrian Gregory est l’auteur de The Last Great War: British Society and the First World War (Cambridge, 2008). Quatrième de couverture:

What was it that the British people believed they were fighting for in 1914–18? This compelling history of the British home front during the First World War offers an entirely new account of how British society understood and endured the war. Drawing on official archives, memoirs, diaries and letters, Adrian Gregory sheds new light on the public reaction to the war, examining the role of propaganda and rumour in fostering patriotism and hatred of the enemy. He shows the importance of the ethic of volunteerism and the rhetoric of sacrifice in debates over where the burdens of war should fall as well as the influence of religious ideas on wartime culture. As the war drew to a climax and tensions about the distribution of sacrifices threatened to tear society apart, he shows how victory and the processes of commemoration helped create a fiction of a society united in grief.

Anna Jenkin: « Condamner, imprimer et lire la meurtrière au 18e siècle à Londres et à Paris »

Anna Jenkin, de l’Université de Sheffield, présentera sa communication « Condamner, imprimer et lire la meurtrière au 18e siècle à Londres et à Paris » le jeudi 12 février, de 17h30 à 19h30.

Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris IV-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421. Le séminaire est ouvert aux étudiants de Master et doctorat, ainsi qu’à toutes les personnes intéressées. En raison des contrôles à l’entrée du bâtiment, il est recommandé d’imprimer cette annonce et de la présenter à l’accueil.

Résumé:

It has been long accepted that women who committed murder in early modern Europe were treated differently from men both in the judicial system and in print culture because the act of murder committed by a woman was more transgressive and subversive than that committed by a man. But this close analysis of the judicial records of London and Paris and the print culture generated around particular cases of female-perpetrated murder will show that this was not the case. Judicially, female-perpetrated murder had low conviction rates in both cities and concern only really focused upon particular kinds of murderesses. In print culture generally cases of female perpetrated murder did not attract any interest at all, yet a very few cases attracted extraordinary levels of print and imaginative engagement. Gender cannot therefore be the only factor in understanding perceptions of the murderess for this this time period, and through the study of Parisian and London reactions to such women we can learn a great more about the specific environments of these two European environments during a period of dramatic change.