LAURA KING : ‘The School Case of Poor Harold: Families’ multi-generational remembrance of deceased children in twentieth-century England’ (12 mai)

Jeudi 12 mai de 17h à 18h30 – Salle D040 à Serpente

 

LAURA KING (Leeds) : ‘The School Case of Poor Harold: Families’ multi-generational remembrance of deceased children in twentieth-century England’

 

‘Poor Harold’ died in 1931, aged nearly eleven, and left behind a school case. This paper examines the story of this ‘ordinary’ boy and his family, who have chosen to preserve his memory through the keeping of this object. The paper examines the case itself, and the story associated with it, as told by Harold’s niece Maureen. In doing so, the article explores remembrance culture in interwar England and inter-generational memory cultures since, focusing on emotional practices, attitudes to death, cross-generational family identities, and changing engagement with religion and faith.

 

Latest monograph : Family Men: Fatherhood and Masculinity in Britain, c.1914-1960 (Oxford University Press, 2015)

 

Contact : Stéphane Jettot jettot@yahoo.com



Emma Griffin, autour de son livre “Bread Winner. An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy” (21/04)

Séminaire franco-britannique d’histoire

https://sfbh.hypotheses.org/

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30

(La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire ).

 Jeudi 21 avril 2022 à 17h: Emma Griffin (East Anglia), autour de son livre Bread Winner. An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale University Press, 2020)

Abstract

Nineteenth century Britain saw remarkable economic growth and a rise in real wages. But not everyone shared in the nation’s wealth. Unable to earn a sufficient income themselves, working-class women were reliant on the ‘breadwinner wage’ of their husbands. When income failed, or was denied or squandered by errant men, families could be plunged into desperate poverty from which there was no escape.
Emma Griffin unlocks the homes of Victorian England to examine the lives – and finances – of the people who lived there. Drawing on over 600 working-class autobiographies, including more than 200 written by women, Bread Winner changes our understanding of daily life in Victorian Britain.

Emma Griffin is a Professor of Modern British History at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of several books, the editor of the Historical Journal, and the President of the Royal Historical Society.

Hugh McLeod, “Le déclin de la chrétienté en Occident. Autour de la crise religieuse des années 1960” (31 mars)

Séminaire franco-britannique d’histoire
Jeudi 31 mars 2022, 17h-18h30
Maison de la recherche
28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

Hugh McLeod (Birmingham), autour de son livre Le déclin de la chrétienté en Occident. Autour de la crise religieuse des années 1960 (traduit par Elise Trogrlic, Labor et Fides, 2021)

Dans cet ouvrage élevé au rang de « classique » par l’English Historical Review, McLeod revisite la crise religieuse des années 1960 dans une perspective européenne et nord-américaine. Son usage des sources orales rend son travail très original et la perspective comparatiste qu’il adopte est assez rare pour être soulignée. Le texte a pour particularité de situer les questions religieuses dans un contexte véritablement international, contribuant ainsi à une histoire internationale de la spiritualité et de la sécularisation, autour de la notion de «déclin» de la chrétienté (revisitée), de la montée de la société de consommation dans les années 1960, de l’année 1968, et des questions de sexualité et de genre. L’ouvrage explore ainsi les interrogations de la décennie des « sixties » pour nous aider à mieux saisir les questions religieuses et spirituelles qui agitent nos sociétés contemporaines.

Traduit de l’anglais par Élise Trogrlic. Préface de Guillaume Cuchet et Géraldine Vaughan

Thomas Jones, “The Foreign Jews Protection Committee: refugee protection and relief in First World War Britain” (17 mars)

Jeudi 17 mars 2022 à 17h_ Thomas Jones (University of Buckingham) “The Foreign Jews Protection Committee: refugee protection and relief in First World War Britain”. 

The First World War was a watershed moment in the history of political and religious asylum in Britain. Though now mostly remembered for the welcome given to Belgian refugees in 1914, the war years saw the permanent end to the legal framework of asylum and prevailing public attitudes towards refugees that had been shaped by the Victorian notion of a universal ‘right of asylum’. Refugees’ rights were significantly curtailed, and many deemed to be of hostile national origin or political orientation were interned and deported, with postwar legislation permanently embedding the new restrictionist dispensation. 

This paper will explore these developments by examining the Foreign Jews Protection Committee, a refugee organization that transformed itself several times in response to the shifting political landscape of these years. Alternatively a mass campaigning body, a registered ‘war charity’, and a conduit facilitating the flow of information and relief funds between the British state and resident refugee populations, the remarkably adaptive FJPC illustrated the bewildering and decisive changes to British asylum wrought in these years.

Thomas C. Jones is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Buckingham. His work focuses on exile, transnationalism, and political thought in modern Europe. He was a founding member of the AsilEuropeXIX network and is currently writing a history of asylum in Britain for Harvard University Press.

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite, ‘No More Walls. Homelessness in London after 1945’ (17 fév.)

Séminaire franco-britannique d’histoire

Jeudi 17 février 2022 à 17h

Maison de la recherche

28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

 

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (University College London), ‘No More Walls. Homelessness in London after 1945’

 

This paper aims to sketch out changing state policy on “homelessness” and the changing ecology of homelessness in postwar London, as well as saying something about how this impacted on the experiences of Londoners who found themselves without a home in the three decades after 1945.

 

The Second World War intensified the emotional weight invested in “home” in British culture; it created mass homelessness in London (and in other cities), but it also ushered in the “people’s peace”, the final sweeping away of the Poor Law, and the beginning of a major push by Labour and Tory governments to build council and private housing. In the three decades after 1945, patterns of homelessness in London were shaped by those developments, as well as slum clearance, new commonwealth migration, racialized council-house allocation policies, full employment and the slow arrival of “affluence”. In this period, street-sleeping was reduced to very low levels in London – though the actual levels were contested – and, more slowly, homelessness and inadequate housing for families were reduced – though never eradicated. Remnants of the Poor Law remained, however, not least in the reception centres which dealt with homeless individuals and families, which were set up in old Poor Law buildings. Remnants of the pre-war way of thinking about homelessness also persisted, in the way policy was gendered, and in the way ‘vagrants’ – those without a ‘settled way of life’ – were thought about. The overview of the infrastructure for and policy about homeless people thus shows that older, moralised ways of approaching the issue persisted in the welfare state.

 

Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite est historienne, spécialiste de la Grande-Bretagne au XXe siècle. Elle est notamment l’auteure de Class, politics, and the decline of deference in England, 1968-2000 (Oxford University Press, 2018), et elle mène, avec Natalie Thomlinson,, un projet d’histoire orale sur les femmes dans la grève des mineurs de 1984-1985.

 

Christine Kinealy, ‘Maud Gonne (1866-1953). The Real Famine Queen’ (16 déc.)

Jeudi 16 décembre à 17h : Christine Kinealy (Quinnipiac University), ‘Maud Gonne (1866-1953). The Real Famine Queen’  

 

 Maud Gonne is frequently remembered as a society beauty who was the unrequited love interest of the poet, W.B. Yeats, while her contributions as a nationalist, artist, actor, lecturer, polemist, feminist, writer and social activist are often marginalized. In particular, Gonne’s engagement with the perennial poverty and intermittent subsistence crises that dogged Ireland in the final decade of the 19th century and into the 20th century has largely been ignored. Yet the visit of Queen Victoria to Dublin in 1900 prompted Gonne to write the polemical article, ‘The Famine Queen’, which first appeared in her journal L’Irlande Libre. The designation has proved to be enduring. 

A celebrity in Ireland, France and North America, this lecture will explore how Gonne used her fame and her connections to help rebuild a transatlantic republican movement following the demise of Charles Stewart Parnell. Moreover, it will show how Gonne’s commitment to social justice remained central to her political activities.  

 Christine Kinealy is professor of History at Quinnipiac University, where she is the founding director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute.

Charles-François Mathis: «Le charbon, un marqueur de civilisation pour l’Angleterre?» (25/11)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

Jeudi 25 novembre à 17h : Charles-François Mathis (Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne), « Le charbon, un marqueur de civilisation pour l’Angleterre ? »

En Angleterre, du règne de Victoria à la Seconde Guerre mondiale, se met en place ce qu’on peut légitimement appeler une « civilisation du charbon », tant ce combustible modèle le paysage, les esprits, le rapport au monde et au temps. Moteur de l’industrie, certes, il est ici plutôt étudié sous l’angle de ses usages domestiques : comment se le procure-t-on à bas coût ? Comment modèle-t-il les intérieurs ? Quels gestes quotidiens nécessite-t-il et comment sont-ils transmis aux enfants ? Quelles sont les stratégies employées par les producteurs et les distributeurs pour défendre auprès des consommateurs cette civilisation lorsqu’elle est mise à mal dans l’entre-deux-guerres ?

Charles-François Mathis est Professeur d’Histoire Contemporaine à l’Université Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne. Son ouvrage La Civilisation du charbon vient de paraître aux éditions Vendémiaire (2021).

Laura Carter, ‘Education, popular history, and everyday life in Britain, 1918-1979’ (28 oct.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

Jeudi 28 octobre à 17h : Laura Carter (Université de Paris / LARCA), autour de son livre Histories of Everyday Life. The Making of Popular Social History in Britain, 1918-1979 (Oxford University Press, 2021)

Title: ‘Education, popular history, and everyday life in Britain, 1918-1979’

Abstract: This paper explores the argument put forth in my latest book, Histories of Everyday Life: The Making of Popular Social History in Britain, 1918-1979 (Oxford University Press, 2021). The history of social history in twentieth-century Britain usually begins in the 1960s, with the rise of ‘history from below’, emanating from universities. This paper presents an alternative, educational history of social history in modern Britain, focusing on popular publishing, the BBC, museums, and the state school classroom. It argues that after 1918 popular social history in Britain was primarily shaped by pedagogical ideas about how ‘ordinary’ people made sense of the past. This form of mass historical education defined mid-twentieth century attitudes to history, and gave female educators a prominent role in crafting historical narratives. It declined in the 1970s not because academics invented a better alternative, but because a more diverse educational public began to demand a different type of history, one that directly addressed issues of power.

Laura Carter est Maîtresse de Conférences en histoire britannique à l’Université de Paris et membre du LARCA.

 

 

Gareth Curless, “Labour, Decolonization and Class: Re-Making Colonial Workers at the End of the British Empire” (08/04)

Jeudi 8 avril 2021 à  17 h : Gareth Curless (University of Exeter), “Labour, Decolonization and Class: Re-Making Colonial Workers at the End of the British Empire”

The strikes and labour riots that swept through the empire during the late 1930s are widely regarded as a watershed moment in the history of British imperialism. According to conventional histories, the unrest was a catalyst for a major reorientation of not just colonial labour policy but colonial attitudes towards social and economic development in the empire. Gareth Curless reconsiders this established narrative, using comparative case studies from Singapore, British Guiana and the Gold Coast.

While accepting that colonial states intervened more directly in the social and economic spheres of colonial rule after the late 1930s, Gareth Curless argues that these policies emerged out of pre-existing policies and debates in both London and the colonies, which in some instances can be traced back to the late 19th century; as the civilising mission gave way to the language of modernisation, colonial labour regimes continued to be concerned with the control, regulation and reproduction of African and Asian workers. Curless shows that the power of the colonial state was not absolute, however, considering African and Asian workers who frequently practiced more subterranean or `everyday’ forms of resistance such as absenteeism, industrial sabotage, theft and go-slow protests. He emphasises the role of class and `ordinary’ Africans and Asians, focusing on the emergence of class identity and consciousness as a result of struggles between colonial workers and employers and the state.

 

Participer à la réunion Zoom : 
Lien habituel, disponible auprès de Yann Béliard

Philippa Levine, “ ‘When I feel very near God, I always feel such a need to undress’: Religion, Nakedness and the Body Divine” (18 mars)

Jeudi 18 mars à 17h : Philippa Levine (Austin / Oxford), “ ‘When I feel very near God, I always feel such a need to undress’: Religion, Nakedness and the Body Divine”


Abstract: Diverse institutions have attempted to order and to organise, to regulate and to banish, to promote and to sell nakedness. Focusing on religion’s always ambivalent relationship with the human body, this talks explores a cultural history with surprisingly powerful contemporary resonance.

Réunion sur Zoom (lien habituel).

19 novembre: l’intervention de Rachel Holmes est annulée

Jeudi 19 novembre à 17h : l’intervention de Rachel Holmes est annulée. 

 En remplacement : Fabrice Bensimon (Sorbonne Université) : « Londres, 10 avril 1848 : les chartistes dans l’œil du photographe »

Résumé : Pour les chartistes, le lundi 10 avril 1848 était un grand jour. Depuis des semaines, ils faisaient signer la pétition pour la Charte du peuple. Celle-ci devait être remise au Parlement, et les chartistes se rassemblèrent au sud de la Tamise, à Kennington Common. Combien étaient-ils ? 400 000, selon leur dirigeant Feargus O’Connor ; 10 000 selon les autorités, une hypothèse basse qu’un dessin de presse semblait confirmer. Le mouvement allait ensuite décliner irrémédiablement 

130 ans plus tard, deux daguerréotypes émergeaient des archives royales. Bien qu’ils aient été abondamment reproduits depuis dans les manuels, les revues ou sur Internet, ces premières photographies politiques de l’histoire n’ont sans pas encore livré tous leurs secrets. Que nous disent-elles du chartisme et de ce moment politique ? Que nous montrent-elles du monde ouvrier, dans ce qui est alors la plus grande ville au monde, le Londres de la révolution industrielle ? 

Le séminaire ne pourra se réunir à la Maison de la Recherche, mais uniquement en visio. Lien habituel, disponible auprès de Yann Béliard yann_beliard(at)yahoo.fr

Jean-François Dunyach et Nathalie Kouamé, autour de leur ouvrage _Sous l’empire des îles. Histoire croisée des mondes britannique et japonais_ (Paris, 2020) (jeudi 15 octobre à 17h)

Jeudi 15 octobre à 17h : Jean-François Dunyach (Sorbonne Université) & Nathalie Kouamé (Université de Paris), autour de leur ouvrage Sous l’empire des îles. Histoire croisée des mondes britannique et japonais , Paris, Karthala, 2020. 

  Présentation (4e de couverture): 

Et si, au regard de l’histoire, le Japon et la Grande-Bretagne n’étaient pas véritablement des îles ? Derrière l’apparente évidence de ces terres entourées d’eau se cachent, peut-être, d’authentiques malentendus. Les innombrables lieux communs sur les cultures et les esprits mentalités prétendument insulaires de ces deux archipels posés à l’Occident et à l’Orient du vaste continent eurasiatique, méritent d’être interrogés. 

Dans cet ouvrage, deux historiens débattent à partir de leur terrain d’élection, le Royaume-Uni pour l’un, le Japon pour l’autre, de la pertinence de la notion d’insularité en histoire. Dans ce dialogue où chaque archipel tend à l’autre un miroir, il est question d’identités, d’échanges, de cosmogonies, de littératures… Insularité subie, insularité proclamée, insularité dépassée : d’où vient la puissance des représentations et des fantasmes que recèle l’expérience insulaire ? Quel est, en somme, l’empire des îles sur l’histoire des mondes britannique et japonais ? 

Évoquant tout autant Robinson Crusoé que le mythe shintô de la création des îles japonaises, la colonisation romaine de l’île de Bretagne et les incursions mongoles au pays du Soleil levant, les pirates du Japon médiéval ou les ressorts du Brexit contemporain, cet ouvrage foisonnant, érudit et stimulant, s’adresse à tous ceux qui ont en partage le goût de « la différence historique ». 

  Attention : le port du masque est obligatoire dans tous les espaces de la Maison de la Recherche. 

La séance sera également diffusée sur Zoom : lien habituel, disponible sur simple demande fbensimon[at]free.fr

Ariane Mak: Enquêter en temps de guerre. De la crainte de l’espion à la controverse ‘ Cooper’s Snoopers ’ (1939-1945) (8 oct.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6 e , Salle D421

Jeudi 8 octobre à 17h : Ariane Mak (Université de Paris) « Enquêter en temps de guerre. De la crainte de l’espion à la controverse ‘ Cooper’s Snoopers ’ (1939-1945) »

Comment enquêter en temps de guerre quand la figure de l’espion hante les esprits ? L’intervention se penche sur un point aveugle de l’histoire du Mass-Observation (1937-1949) – à savoir la manière dont cette organisation britannique de sciences sociales a dû faire face à une suspicion généralisée durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Celle-ci s’exprime en premier lieu dans l’enquête de terrain, alors que les enquêteurs du Mass-Observation, soupçonnés d’espionnage, se voient pris en filature par une population aux aguets, voire emmenés au poste. Cette méfiance se dit à un autre niveau dans la controverse médiatico -politique des « Cooper’s Snoopers » qui éclate autour de l’usage d’enquêtes scientifiques – et de l’enquête d’opinion en particulier – par l’État. Entre suspicion de surveillance politique et moqueries face à la prétendue scientificité des méthodes employées, le scandale s’étale dans la presse avant de s’inviter dans les débats de la Chambre des Communes. L’intervention interroge les rapports entre science et politique, et éclaire la figure ambivalente du scientifique et de l’enquêteur de terrain dans le Royaume-Uni des années 1940.

Attention : le port du masque est obligatoire dans tous les espaces de la Maison de la Recherche.
La communication d’Ariane Mak sera également diffusée sur Zoom : lien habituel, disponible auprès de fbensimon[at]free.fr


Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite: “Something changed, I’m sure it did, for women; it must have”: Deindustrialisation and individualism in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields after 1945 (1er octobre)

Attention : cette séance n’aura pas lieu à la Maison de la Recherche, mais uniquement en visioconférence: veuillez contacter fbensimon(at)free.fr pour avoir le lien


Jeudi 1er octobre à 17h : Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (University College London) : ‘”Something changed, I’m sure it did, for women; it must have”: Deindustrialisation and individualism in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields after 1945’
 
Economic historian Jim Tomlinson has recently suggested that deindustrialisation should be used as an alternative meta-narrative for understanding postwar British history, transecting the typical political narrative that structures understandings of the period – that is, the story of a ‘social democratic’ settlement inaugurated by Attlee and then disrupted in the 1970s and replaced with a Thatcherite or ‘neoliberal’ one.  Writing from the perspective of social and cultural history, I have recently written, along with Emily Robinson, Camilla Schofield, and Natalie Thomlinson, of the importance of growing discourses of popular individualism in the postwar decades, which, in a similar way, cut across and interacted with Thatcherism, but which were not driven predominantly by politics. In this paper, I analyse how deindustrialisation and individualism changed the structure and culture of family life in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields in the decades after 1945.


Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite travaille en particulier sur l’expérience des femmes dans la grève des mineurs de 1984-1985 https://www.coalfield-women.org