Emma Griffin, autour de son livre “Bread Winner. An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy” (21/04)

Séminaire franco-britannique d’histoire

https://sfbh.hypotheses.org/

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30

(La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire ).

 Jeudi 21 avril 2022 à 17h: Emma Griffin (East Anglia), autour de son livre Bread Winner. An Intimate History of the Victorian Economy (Yale University Press, 2020)

Abstract

Nineteenth century Britain saw remarkable economic growth and a rise in real wages. But not everyone shared in the nation’s wealth. Unable to earn a sufficient income themselves, working-class women were reliant on the ‘breadwinner wage’ of their husbands. When income failed, or was denied or squandered by errant men, families could be plunged into desperate poverty from which there was no escape.
Emma Griffin unlocks the homes of Victorian England to examine the lives – and finances – of the people who lived there. Drawing on over 600 working-class autobiographies, including more than 200 written by women, Bread Winner changes our understanding of daily life in Victorian Britain.

Emma Griffin is a Professor of Modern British History at the University of East Anglia. She is the author of several books, the editor of the Historical Journal, and the President of the Royal Historical Society.

Chris Manias, ‘The Age of Mammals: Nature, Development and Palaeontology in the long nineteenth century’ (14 avril)

Séminaire franco-britannique d’histoire

https://sfbh.hypotheses.org/

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30

(La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire ).

 

Jeudi 14 avril 2022 à 17h: Chris Manias (King’s College), ‘The Age of Mammals: Nature, Development and Palaeontology in the long nineteenth century

 

Abstract

When people today hear ‘paleontology,’ they immediately think of dinosaurs. However, for much of the history of the discipline, scientists and public audiences seeking dramatic demonstrations of the history of life focused on something else: the developmental history of the mammals. Assumptions that ‘the Age of Mammals’ represented the pinnacle of animal life made mammals crucial for understanding the formation (and possibly the future) of the natural world. Yet this combined with more troubling notions, that seemingly promising creatures had been swept aside in the ‘struggle for life’ or that modern biodiversity was ‘impoverished’ compared to previous eras. Why some prehistoric creatures, such as the sabre-tooth cat and ground sloth, had become extinct, while others seemed to have been the ancestors of familiar animals like elephants and horses, were questions loaded with cultural assumptions, ambiguity and trepidation. And how humans related to deep developmental processes, and whether the ‘Age of Man’ was qualitatively different from the ‘Age of Mammals,’ led to reflections on humanity’s place within the natural world.

 

This paper will outline Chris Manias’ current book project, which examines how nineteenth-century scholars, writers, artists and publics understood the developmental history of the mammals ­- the animals they regarded as being at the summit of life. Using mammal paleontology as its central focus, the project examines how paleontological theories of development and reconstructions of fossil beasts led to new understandings of the environment and animal world. Taking in examples from Europe, North and South America, and colonial contexts, the project argues that nineteenth-century engagement with animals and the environment were preconditioned on ideas drawn from the deep-time sciences, which promoted a world-wide vision of nature and modern life as inscribed by a deep natural history.

 

 

Biography

Chris Manias is Senior Lecturer in the History of Science & Technology at King’s College London.  He is a specialist in the history of science in modern Europe and North America, with special interests in the history and wider cultural impacts of the human, evolutionary and deep-time sciences.  His first book, Race, Science and the Nation: Reconstructing the Ancient Past in Britain, France and Germany, 1800-1914, examined the transnational development of understandings of national origins in the nineteenth-century, and interchanges between anthropology, archaeology and comparative linguistics.  He is currently working on a book project entitled The Age of Mammals: Nature, Development and Palaeontology in the Long Nineteenth Century (forthcoming with University of Pittsburgh Press, 2023), which examines how the deep past of the mammals was reconstructed in the nineteenth century, and used to define the present of the natural world. 

 

Niall O’Flaherty : “Malthus and the Discovery of Poverty” (24 fév.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

 

Jeudi 24 février à 17h : Niall O’Flaherty (King’s College London) : ‘Malthus and the Discovery of Poverty’

Few books have cast such a long shadow as the second edition of T. R. Malthus’ Essay on the Principle of Population (1803). Yet it remains one of the most poorly understood books published during the last two hundred years. I argue that the ‘Great Quarto’ should no longer be read primarily as a work of demography or economics, but as a seminal work in the science of poverty – the first book to try to explain the structural causes and social effects of hardship, and to offer a root-and-branch solution to the problem. In the paper, I will also show that both Malthus’s political and religious ideas were subservient to this social programme and not vice versa as has long been argued. 

Niall O’Flaherty est Senior Lecturer in the History of European Political Thought à King’s College London. Il a publié Utilitarianism in the Age of Enlightenment: the moral and political thought of William Paley (CUP, 2019). Il participé à l’ouvrage New Perspectives on Malthus dirigé par R. J. Mayhew (CUP, 2016). 

 

Robert Poole, ‘After Peterloo: the British Risings of 1819-20’ (3 fév.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, de 17h à 18h30

(La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement).

Jeudi 3 février à 17h, salle D040 : Robert Poole (University of Central Lancashire), ‘After Peterloo: the British Risings of 1819-20’.

 

Abstract

The nine months after the ‘Peterloo massacre’ of 16 August 1819 saw a dramatic series of mass protests and attempted uprisings. The best known are those described in Malcolm Chase’s book 1820:  the Cato Street conspiracy to assassinate the government in London, and the subsequent rebellions in Yorkshire, Ireland, and Scotland. 1819 however saw an extensive series of protests which continued and intensified the ‘mass platform’ movement which led up to Peterloo.  These varied from official town and county meetings sanctioned by local authorities to secretive gatherings in the north intended to set off armed uprisings. This paper will look at the connections between the mass platform movement and the armed conspiracies, asking: how close did Britain come to revolution after Peterloo? 

History of Parliament video: ‘What Happened After Peterloo?’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLl_RA4kxs0

 

Matilda Greig, “Napoleonic War Veterans and the Military Memoir Industry, 1808-1914” (27 jan.)

Jeudi 27 janvier à 17h : Matilda Greig (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelone), autour de son  livre, Dear Men Telling Tales: Napoleonic War Veterans and the Military Memoir Industry, 1808-1914 (Oxford, 2021)

As Napoleon’s wars drew to a close in 1815, a series of ripples flowed out into the publishing world. Veterans of the different campaigns had begun releasing memoirs of their experiences, in greater numbers than ever before, and with the help of descendants, publishers and translators, the tide would continue until well into the twentieth century. In this discussion of my book, Dead Men Telling Tales: Napoleonic War Veterans and the Military Memoir Industry, 1808-1914 (Oxford University Press, 2021), I explore the impact these personal stories had upon the history and representation of this period. Taking the Peninsular War as my case study, I show how the ‘soldier’s tale’ evolved differently in Spain versus France and Britain, how national histories of the same war remained starkly opposing over time, and how veterans themselves played an active role in the publication of their work. I conclude by considering the ironic legacy these books and their lasting commercial success left for the First World War generation – a myth of war as a positive, exciting and masculine experience, where quick victory was possible and glory could be won.

Christine Kinealy, ‘Maud Gonne (1866-1953). The Real Famine Queen’ (16 déc.)

Jeudi 16 décembre à 17h : Christine Kinealy (Quinnipiac University), ‘Maud Gonne (1866-1953). The Real Famine Queen’  

 

 Maud Gonne is frequently remembered as a society beauty who was the unrequited love interest of the poet, W.B. Yeats, while her contributions as a nationalist, artist, actor, lecturer, polemist, feminist, writer and social activist are often marginalized. In particular, Gonne’s engagement with the perennial poverty and intermittent subsistence crises that dogged Ireland in the final decade of the 19th century and into the 20th century has largely been ignored. Yet the visit of Queen Victoria to Dublin in 1900 prompted Gonne to write the polemical article, ‘The Famine Queen’, which first appeared in her journal L’Irlande Libre. The designation has proved to be enduring. 

A celebrity in Ireland, France and North America, this lecture will explore how Gonne used her fame and her connections to help rebuild a transatlantic republican movement following the demise of Charles Stewart Parnell. Moreover, it will show how Gonne’s commitment to social justice remained central to her political activities.  

 Christine Kinealy is professor of History at Quinnipiac University, where she is the founding director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute.

Charles-François Mathis: «Le charbon, un marqueur de civilisation pour l’Angleterre?» (25/11)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

Jeudi 25 novembre à 17h : Charles-François Mathis (Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne), « Le charbon, un marqueur de civilisation pour l’Angleterre ? »

En Angleterre, du règne de Victoria à la Seconde Guerre mondiale, se met en place ce qu’on peut légitimement appeler une « civilisation du charbon », tant ce combustible modèle le paysage, les esprits, le rapport au monde et au temps. Moteur de l’industrie, certes, il est ici plutôt étudié sous l’angle de ses usages domestiques : comment se le procure-t-on à bas coût ? Comment modèle-t-il les intérieurs ? Quels gestes quotidiens nécessite-t-il et comment sont-ils transmis aux enfants ? Quelles sont les stratégies employées par les producteurs et les distributeurs pour défendre auprès des consommateurs cette civilisation lorsqu’elle est mise à mal dans l’entre-deux-guerres ?

Charles-François Mathis est Professeur d’Histoire Contemporaine à l’Université Paris 1 – Panthéon Sorbonne. Son ouvrage La Civilisation du charbon vient de paraître aux éditions Vendémiaire (2021).

Arnaud Page : « Rationaliser la nutrition : une histoire de l’azote, 1840-1914 » (18 nov.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

 

Jeudi 18 novembre à 17h : Arnaud Page (Sorbonne Université / HDEA): « Rationaliser la nutrition : une histoire de l’azote, 1840- 1914 »

 Cette communication présentera les grandes lignes d’un projet de recherche dont l’objectif est de retracer l’essor, dans la seconde moitié du dix-neuvième siècle, de la quantification des éléments chimiques entrant en jeu dans la nutrition, tant végétale qu’animale. Ce travail vise à montrer comment la quantification d’un élément en particulier (l’azote) fut le pivot d’une vaste entreprise de « mise en nombre » des phénomènes nutritifs, qui modifia en profondeur les façons d’appréhender les questions agricoles et alimentaires. Il s’agit d’étudier de façon croisée les travaux d’agronomes, de chimistes et de médecins, mais également d’étudier la réception, l’utilisation et les contestations de ces nouveaux savoirs dans les domaines politiques, économiques et sociaux (workhouses, publicité, musées, réformateurs sociaux, etc.).

 

Arnaud Page est Maître de Conférences en civilisation britannique à Sorbonne Université.

Anne Verjus, « James Henry Lawrence (1773-1840), ou quand la pensée aristocratique sert la cause des femmes » (21 oct.)

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire ). 

Jeudi 21  octobre à 17h : Anne Verjus (ENS Lyon, UMR Triangle), « James Henry Lawrence (1773-1840), ou quand la pensée aristocratique sert la cause des femmes »

L’Empire des Nairs, de James H. Lawrence, est une utopie dans laquelle ont été abolis le mariage et la paternité. Elle a l’originalité de prévoir les moyens d’assurer aux femmes une indépendance matérielle à l’égard des hommes. Mais, et c’est son paradoxe principal, elle se veut moins au service de l’émancipation féminine que de la consolidation de l’authenticité des lignées. Utopie avant tout aristocratique, elle présente pourtant le projet féministe le plus radical de son temps. Peu connue aujourd’hui, elle fut à l’époque lue et relayée par Shelley, Godwin, Schiller ou Goethe, ou encore Richard Carlile, Claire Demar ou Flora Tristan.

 Anne Verjus est directrice de recherche au CNRS en science politique et histoire sociale des idées. 

 

 

Marine Bellégo, « L’Empire britannique et les sciences du végétal : le cas du jardin botanique de Calcutta (XIXe siècle) » (14 oct.)

Jeudi 14  octobre à 17h : Marine Bellégo (Université de Paris), « L’Empire britannique et les sciences du végétal : le cas du jardin botanique de Calcutta (XIXe siècle) »

 

Créé à la fin du XVIIIe siècle par la East India Company, le jardin botanique de Calcutta devint au XIXe siècle un important centre d’acclimatation et de classification d’espèces végétales. Financé par l’empire britannique, alors à son apogée, dont Calcutta demeura la capitale en Inde jusqu’en 1911, le jardin contribuait à la fois économiquement et symboliquement au dispositif impérial. En même temps qu’il servait les capitalistes britanniques en favorisant l’exploitation agricole des terres colonisées, le jardin incarnait un discours historique selon lequel la colonisation était une entreprise civilisatrice. Son espace sémiotiquement dense mettait en scène la maîtrise coloniale de la nature. Les plantes, spécimens et publications qu’il produisait alimentaient le fonctionnement à la fois matériel et discursif d’un pouvoir qui se disait mondial, fécond et scientifique. Cependant, tout comme l’empire qu’il servait et représentait, le jardin était dysfonctionnel par bien des aspects. À partir de sources variées, le livre “Enraciner l’Empire”, à paraître en décembre 2021 élabore une histoire spatiale, matérielle et sociale de cette institution qui permet d’ouvrir de nouvelles perspectives sur le fait impérial en Inde à la fin du XIXe siècle.

Marine Bellégo est maîtresse de conférences à l’Université de Paris et membre du LARCA.

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire ).

John-Erik Hansson, « Former et réformer la jeunesse : William Godwin et les enjeux de l’écriture de livres pour enfants » (7 oct. 2021)

Jeudi 7 octobre à 17h : John-Erik Hansson (Université de Paris / LARCA), « Former et réformer la jeunesse : William Godwin et les enjeux de l’écriture de livres pour enfants ».

William Godwin (1756-1836) est connu d’abord et avant tout comme un « jacobin anglais », auteur de l’anarchisante Enquiry Concerning Political Justice (1793) et du roman jacobin Caleb Williams (1794). Il est toutefois également l’auteur d’essais sur l’éducation et la pédagogie – publiés dans The Enquirer (1797) – et de livres pour enfants (entre 1802 et 1822). De 1805 à 1825, il est même propriétaire d’une librairie et maison d’édition, la Juvenile Library, pour laquelle il rédige 9 ouvrages allant du recueil de fables à l’histoire de la Grèce antique. Je propose dans cette communication de revenir sur ces textes trop souvent vus comme mineurs, l’œuvre d’un auteur dans le besoin, détachés de l’action d’un Godwin qui disparaît graduellement du paysage politique à partir de la fin des années 1790. En remettant ces ouvrages dans le contexte de sa pensée politique, de l’offre de livres pour enfants de l’époque et des débats de la fin du XVIIIè et du début du XIXè siècle concernant notamment l’éducation, la moralité, la religion et l’histoire, je montre qu’au contraire, Godwin cherche à poursuivre ses efforts de réforme politique à travers ces livres. Il s’attaque aux fondements de l’éducation des classes moyennes britanniques, afin de contribuer à la formation d’une nouvelle génération qui engagerait la marche vers le progrès social et politique.

 

Reforming the youth: William Godwin as a writer of children’s books

William Godwin (1756-1836) is mostly known as an “English Jacobin” and as the author of the anarchistic Enquiry Concerning Political Justice (1793) and the Jacobin novel Caleb Williams (1794). However, he was also the author of essays on education – collected in The Enquirer (1797) – and children’s books (between 1802 and 1822). From 1805 to 1825, he even owned a bookselling business, the Juvenile Library, for which he wrote 9 works, from a collection of fables to a history of Classical Greece. In this paper, I want to examine these works which have too often been treated as minor, the hackwork of a penniless out-of-fashion radical, detached from the political activity that had made him famous in the 1790s. Against this view, I show that these children’s books were Godwin’s way of pursuing radical reform. To do so, I replace them works in the contexts of Godwin’s own thought, the range of similar writing for children at the time, and broader late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century intellectual debates, particularly those concerning education, morality, religion, and history. I show how Godwin challenged the foundations of middle-class education in Britain, to contribute to the growth of a new generation, better equipped to bring about social and political progress.

John-Erik Hansson est Maître de Conférences en histoire britannique à l’Université de Paris et membre du LARCA. 

Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, Salle D421, de 17h à 18h30 (La séance aura lieu en présentiel uniquement. Un enregistrement sera diffusé ultérieurement sur la chaine youtube du séminaire).

Julian Pooley, “Printing the Past: Discovering the Archive of the Nichols family of printers, antiquaries and editors of the Gentleman’s Magazine,1777-1873” (25 mars)

Thursday March 25, 2021 at 5 p.m. : Julian Pooley (University of Leicester) “Printing the Past: Discovering the Archive of the Nichols family of printers, antiquaries and editors of the Gentleman’s Magazine,1777-1873”.

 

This paper tells the story of how the purchase of an anonymous pocket diary in a London bookshop, led me to discover extensive and previously unknown archives of John Nichols (1745-1826) and his family of printers, antiquaries and editors of the Gentleman’s Magazine.  Nichols was one of Georgian London’s most prominent printers, contracted to print for Parliament, the Royal Society and Society of Antiquaries.  He was also a literary biographer, chronicling the book trade and its customers over the long-eighteenth century; a pioneer of Renaissance culture through his Progresses of Queen Elizabeth and a leading antiquary whose History and Antiquities of the Town and County of Leicester 4 vols (1795-1815) transformed the way that English local history was written and illustrated.  The vast archive of family and business papers which he and his successors accumulated inspired his granddaughter to form her own collection of autograph letters, augmented by exchange with other collectors and by purchases in the London and Paris salerooms.  This internationally significant collection is now part of the 20,000 Nichols papers calendared and accessible via the Nichols Archive Database.  This paper will explore the value of the archive for studying the career of John Nichols, his editorship of the Gentleman’s Magazine and his achievements as a literary biographer and antiquary. It will also highlight some of the many French historical documents preserved in this archive.

 

Julian Pooley F.S.A. is Hon. Visiting Fellow of the Centre for English Local History at the University of Leicester and Public Services and Engagement Manager at Surrey History Centre, Woking.

Links:

Nichols Archive Project

https://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/history/people/staff-pages/previous-staff/jpooley/julian-pooley

http://www.bibsoc.org.uk/content/nichols-archive-project

 

Séance sur Zoom, lien habituel, disponible auprès de Stéphane Jettot

 <jettot@yahoo.com>

Philippa Levine, “ ‘When I feel very near God, I always feel such a need to undress’: Religion, Nakedness and the Body Divine” (18 mars)

Jeudi 18 mars à 17h : Philippa Levine (Austin / Oxford), “ ‘When I feel very near God, I always feel such a need to undress’: Religion, Nakedness and the Body Divine”


Abstract: Diverse institutions have attempted to order and to organise, to regulate and to banish, to promote and to sell nakedness. Focusing on religion’s always ambivalent relationship with the human body, this talks explores a cultural history with surprisingly powerful contemporary resonance.

Réunion sur Zoom (lien habituel).

Marie Ruiz, “Training emigrants to the New World: schools of horticulture and agriculture in Britain and Canada” (11 fév.)

Jeudi 11 février 2021 à  17 h : Marie Ruiz (LARCA / université de Picardie),  “Training emigrants to the New World: schools of horticulture and agriculture in Britain and Canada”

 

Cette communication porte sur la formation des migrants et migrantes britanniques en Grande-Bretagne et au Canada et leur préparation à la vie rurale dans les colonies au tournant du XXe siècle. Cette étude est fondée sur les centres de formation pour migrants, partenaires de deux sociétés d’émigration métropolitaines : la British Women’s Emigration Association (1884-1919) et la Church Emigration Society (1886-1929). Ces centres de formation répondaient aux préoccupations de l’époque : les écarts démographiques entre les sexes, la dépression rurale et la productivité coloniale. Le recensement de 1901 indique que seulement 6% des femmes britanniques occupaient officiellement des emplois dans l’agriculture, et elles intervenaient surtout dans la petite culture et l’horticulture. Développer l’emploi des femmes dans l’agriculture et l’horticulture était une solution proposée par les militantes pour l’émancipation féminine. L’étude des centres de formation pour migrants met également en évidence le développement de l’éducation scientifique pour les femmes en réponse aux questions sanitaires de l’époque.

 Participer à la réunion Zoom : lien habituel, disponible auprès de fbensimon(at) free.fr

Robert Poole, « Peterloo and the English Radical Press » (4 fév.)

Jeudi 4 février 2021 à  17 h : Robert Poole (University of Central Lancashire ), « Peterloo and the English Radical Press »

The Manchester Observer (1818-22) was England’s leading radical newspaper at the time of the ‘Peterloo’ meeting of August 1819, in which it played a central role. For a time it enjoyed the highest circulation of any provincial newspaper, holding a position comparable to that of the Chartist Northern Star twenty years later. It also pioneered dual publication in Manchester and London. Its columns provide insights into Manchester’s secretive local government and into labour and radical movements. Correspondence in the National Archives demonstrates the relationship between radicals in London and in the provinces, and shows how local magistrates conspired with government to prosecute the radical press in the north, where juries were more pliable than those in London. The experience of the Manchester Observer also played a role in the founding of the Manchester Guardian, now simply The Guardian, whose bicentenary is marked by an exhibition in Manchester in 2021.

Links:

The Manchester Observer is digitised as part of the Peterloo Collection at the John Rylands Library, University of Manchester: https://luna.manchester.ac.uk/luna/servlet/Manchester~24~24

(search for ‘Manchester Observer’)

‘The Manchester Observer: biography of a radical newspaper’, open access at https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/manup/bjrl

 Robert Poole, professeur à University of Central Lancashire, est notamment l’auteur de Peterloo. The English Uprising (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2019) https://global.oup.com/academic/product/peterloo-9780198783466?cc=fr&lang=en&

Participer à la réunion Zoom : lien habituel, disponible auprès de fbensimon(at)free.fr