John R. Young : « The Constitutional Reform programme of the Earl of Mar in the 1720s » (31/05)

Dr John R. Young, de University of Strathclyde, présentera sa communication « The Constitutional Reform programme of the Earl of Mar in the 1720s », le jeudi 31 mai 2018 de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

The talk will examine a remarkable set of writings by John Erskine, Earl of Mar, in which Mar outlined an alternative future and constitutional relationship that challenged the 1707 Act of Union between Scotland and England and the 1714 Hanoverian Succession. Mar is a fascinating individual. He was a key figure in successfully managing the negotiated 1706 Treaty of Union through the final session of the Scottish Parliament in 1706-1707 with a principled commitment to a union of incorporation with England. Yet he became a leading figure in the Jacobite movement, especially the 1715 Rebellion. Mar’s writings in the 1720s sought the repeal of the Act of Union and a federal union with Ireland. His writings display a deep level of political and constitutional sophistication, with specific reference to proposed arrangements for a Jacobite restoration, redefined relationships between Scotland, England and Ireland, as well as colonial north America and the French connection. Mar has been the subject of recent historical interest. Dr Young’s talk will examine the extent to which Mar drew on the constitutional precedents of the Covenanting movement in the seventeenth century and legislative precedents from the Revolution of 1689-90 in Scotland and the Scottish parliamentary sessions of 1703-1704 to produce a body of work which can be described as representing a programme of Constitutional Jacobitism for a ‘new’ Scotland in the context of Jacobite Restoration.

 

Dr John R. Young is a double graduate of the University of Glasgow. He is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. He has published widely on early modern Scottish history, including the Covenanting movement and Scotland and Ulster links. In 2013 his article on Sir Robert Adair of Kinhilt was published in the Journal of Scotch-Irish Studies, in the USA. He is a leading member of the International Commission for the History of Representative and Parliamentary Institutions (ICHRPI). He is the editor the journal Parliaments, Estates and Representation.

 

Greg S. Brown : « Le jardin anglais comme espace anti-urbain dans quelques maisons privées de Paris de la 2eme moitié du XVIIIe siècle »

Greg S. Brown, de l’université d’Oxford, présentera sa communication « Le jardin anglais comme espace anti-urbain dans quelques maisons privées de Paris de la 2eme moitié du XVIIIe siècle », le jeudi 3 mai 2018 de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

Résumé :

« The Treaty of Paris of 1763 reshaped many aspects of the relationship between between France and Britain and their respective societies. The major consequence for France, the surrender of most of France’s North American landholdings and major colonies of New France and Louisiana, but retaining the Carribean islands, had significant consequences at home as well — including, paradoxically, an influx of private capital investment from colonial traders and retired military officers. It also occasioned a cultural reassessment by the French of English taste and manners, which suddenly seemed less barbarous and more authentic, even elegant.

At the same time, and as a direct result of the financial and political debacle of the war’s outcome, the French crown pursued administrative state which had been pursued actively under Louis XV, were intensified by the political rise of Turgot. This included changes in law and governance of France’s large cities, including Paris, which included tax and land-use policies to encourage the expansion of the city and the opening of its thoroughfares and sightlines.

The consequence was a building boom, especially in residential housing. While mostly concentrated to the north and west of the city, there were also new, genteel homes developed along the outer edge of newly constructed boulevards.

This paper will be a discussion of some of the cultural consequences of this building boom, changes in the theory and practice of architectural design, gardens, and material culture — as the boundaries of public and private space were renegotiated on the eve of the Revolution. »

Contact : Stéphane Jettot, stephane.jettot@sorbonne-universite.fr

Liesbeth Corens : Confessional Mobility and English Catholics in Counter-Reformation Europe (05/04)

Liesbeth Corens, de Keble College, Oxford, présentera une communication autour de la publication prochaine de son livre: Confessional Mobility and English Catholics in Counter-Reformation Europe,  Oxford University Press, 2018, le jeudi 5 avril 2018 de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

Résumé :

« A la fin du XVIIème siècle et au début du XVIIIème siècle, les catholiques anglais ont entrepris une vaste collecte d’archives sur leur passé et sur leur résistance à la Réforme protestante. A partir d’un long travail de compilation, ils ont accumulé une diversité considérable de documents : des témoignages oraux retranscrits, des pamphlets imprimés, des lettres écrites par les martyrs en personne et des archives officielles. La diversité des supports mobilisés ainsi que la complémentarité de leurs usages marquent de nouvelles transformations dans les rapports entre des sources, l’érudition et la mémoire. Ces compilations constituent des observatoires privilégiés pour aborder les interactions entre les pratiques archivistiques et les commémorations. Elles reposent sur l’entretien de la mémoire locale des martyres, à partir des traditions orales maintenues dans les communautés catholiques et du travail commémoratif entrepris dans les institutions religieuses. Cependant les compilateurs avaient aussi pour ambition de se détacher des lieux de mémoire et des souvenirs à vif pour entrer dans la constitution d’un récit historique. La diversité des supports soulève aussi la question de leurs crédibilités respectives, de leurs usages et de leurs rapports à la vérité. Mon intervention au séminaire se propose d’explorer les étapes de ces constructions et de mener par là une réflexion sur le pouvoir des pratiques archivistiques et commémoratives et leur place dans la constitution d’une contre-mémoire. »

*****

In the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, English Catholics collected records of their recent past and their opposition to the Reformation. The compilations recorded a multiplicity of materials, ranging from reports on oral statements, to printed pamphlets, letters written by martyrs themselves, and official records. The inclusion of various types of media and the transfer from one context to another marks changes in sources’ commemorative and scholarly roles that must be explored. The compilations offer an insightful case to study the interrelation between record-keeping and commemoration. They relied heavily on local commemorative practices, both through English communities’ oral traditions of their local martyrs, and through religious houses’ commemoration of the martyrs who had studied with them. Yet the compilers also attempted to detach themselves from the lived commemoration and establish lieux de mémoire, working on the interface between an active memory and history writing. Different media have different criteria for credibility, different priorities, different claims to truth. This paper will explore these transitions and in the process reflect on the power of record-keeping and commemorating in the production of counter-archives.

 

Contact: stephane.jettot@sorbonne-universite.fr

Maxine Berg : « Value and Exchange at Nootka Sound: Alexander Walker’s Global Microhistory 1785-6 » (07/12)

Maxine Berg, professeur d’histoire à Warwick University (History Department), présentera sa communication « Value and Exchange at Nootka Sound: Alexander Walker’s Global Microhistory 1785-6 » le jeudi 7 décembre 2017 de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

Résumé :

« This seminar paper will take us to a small obscure and far-away place on the Northwest Pacific Coast of North America – Nootka Sound.  It has a very local history as a place of seasonal residence and ceremony for the Mowachaht people, a group within the larger Nuu-chah-nulth language category, dating back over 4,000 years. It also has a wide global and international history as the site of a sea otter trade linking Britain, India and China as well as Russia, Spain, France and the USA to this coast. Europeans first encountered the peoples of Nootka Sound in the 1770s: a Spanish ship, the Santiago, anchored briefly near the coast in 1774, and Captain Cook spent an extended period there on his third voyage in 1778. It was the site of an international incident in 1790 – the Nootka Crisis between Spain and Britain, and the place of the Nootka Conventions of 1790-94 settling codes over claims to territories and leading into the settlement of borders between the U.S. and British Columbia.

This paper investigates accounts of events of a trade in sea otter furs for iron and copper as conveyed by Europeans between 1774 and 1792, and especially the account provided by Alexander Walker in 1786.  Walker’s account takes me to the heart of connections between the Pacific and an East India Company trade between the Pacific and the Indian Ocean and East Asia. This paper approaches the Nootka Crisis from a methodology of ‘global microhistory’, and from the framework of ‘locality’ and ’interstitial spaces’ in global history. »

 

Ophélie Siméon : « Robert Owen’s Experiment at New Lanark. From Paternalism to Socialism » (09/11)

Ophélie Siméon, maître de conférences en Civilisation britannique à l’Université Paris III – Sorbonne nouvelle, présentera sa communication « Robert Owen’s Experiment at New Lanark. From Paternalism to Socialism » le jeudi 9 novembre de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

« De 1800 à1825, l’industriel éclairé Robert Owen transforme son village ouvrier textile de New Lanark (Écosse) en un véritable laboratoire social destiné à prouver une série d’intuitions politiques qui formeront dans les années 1825-1845 le socle du premier mouvement socialiste de Grande-Bretagne.

Référent omniprésent dans les histoires du socialisme britannique, New Lanark demeure cependant mal connu. Relégué dans l’ombre d’Owen, le village ouvrier a avant tout été perçu comme le réceptacle de politiques paternalistes innovantes. Bien au contraire, New Lanark a également été une source d’inspiration fondamentale pour Owen, et a notamment servi de modèle pour son système d’organisation sociale communautaire.

En réalisant une histoire sociale des idées d’Owen, ancrée dans l’étude de la vie quotidienne au sein de New Lanark, et de la réception de l’expérience auprès du grand public comme de la population ouvrière, ce livre réaffirme l’importance du village écossais dans l’émergence du socialisme britannique. En délaissant les approches qui limiteraient New Lanark à un statut de “village modèle” unidimentionnel, il interroge les ambiguïtés d’une pensée entre théorie et pratique, du paternalisme au socialisme. »

Zara Anishanslin : « Designing the Botanical Landscape of Empire: Anna Maria Garthwaite (1688-1763), Silk Designer » (12/10)

Zara Anishanslin, de University of Delaware, présentera sa communication « Designing the Botanical Landscape of Empire: Anna Maria Garthwaite (1688-1763), Silk Designer », le jeudi 12 octobre 2017, de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

Discutante : Ariane Fennetaux (Université Paris Diderot)

Résumé :

« Enigmatic Anna Maria Garthwaite (1688-1763) was one of early modern Britain’s few women silk designers. She also was one of its most prolific. A clergyman’s daughter with family connections to the Royal Society of London and Chelsea Physic Garden, she had intimate ties to global natural history networks that found aesthetic expression in her design work. Garthwaite used her designs to create new hybrid English landscapes that blended native flora with exotic imported botanicals, including plants from Africa, North America, and the Caribbean. Her popular designs both mirrored the larger cultural fascination with things botanical and helped foster the craze for wearing botanical landscapes in silk around the British Empire. Objects that embodied important intersections between fashion and science, her textile designs carried the same eighteenth-century fascination with flowers and botanicals eagerly embraced by men in global natural history networks. This paper looks at women who made and wore silk on both sides of the Atlantic to explore how Garthwaite helped design the botanical landscape of empire. »

Zara Anishanslin specializes in Early Atlantic World History, with a focus on eighteenth-century material culture. Since 2016, she has been Assistant Professor of History and Art History at the University of Delaware where she is working on a new research project on the American Revolution. Anishanslin holds a PhD in the History of American Civilization from the University of Delaware, and held postdoctoral fellowships at Johns Hopkins University and the New York Historical Society. Her book Portrait of a Woman in Silk: Hidden Histories of the British Atlantic World (Yale University Press, 2016) examines the worlds of four identifiable people who produced, wore, and represented silk: a London weaver, one of early modern Britain’s few women silk designers, a Philadelphia merchant’s wife, and a New England painter.

Cette séance est financée par le LARCA (Paris Diderot) et l’IUF (Projet « L’Europe des objets », Anne-Marie Miller-Blaise)

Contact : Sandrine Parageau (sparageau@parisnanterre.fr)

Anne Dunan-Page : « Les archives dissidentes des 17e et 18e siècles : pour une histoire de la religion vécue  » (27/04)

Anne Dunan-Page, de l’université Aix-Marseille, présentera sa communication « Les archives dissidentes des 17e et 18e siècles : pour une histoire de la religion vécue  » le jeudi 27 avril 2017, de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.

Discutants : Pierre Lurbe (Paris IV-Sorbonne) et Rémy Bethmont (Paris VIII).

Résumé :

« Le concept de « religion vécue » (lived religion), issu de la sociologie des religions, a été notamment popularisé aux États-Unis au milieu des années 80 par Robert Orsi et The Madonna of 115th Street, étude de la communauté catholique italienne à Harlem, demeure un ouvrage essentiel. Des tentatives de définition d’un concept parfois jugé trop vague pour être opérationnel se sont alors multipliées, mettant l’accent sur les phénomènes de création et d’imagination qui entrent en tension avec les dogmes et les institutions religieuses, phénomènes liés à des « expériences » du vécu. Comme d’autres transdisciplines, la religion vécue, qui convoque des méthodes issues de la sociologie, de l’ethnologie, de la psychologie, de l’histoire, de la théologie pastorale, des études de genre, est aujourd’hui en voie d’institutionnalisation, tandis que se multiplient les analyses des sociétés multi-confessionnelles.

Le but de ce séminaire est de préciser pourquoi il nous paraît pertinent de convoquer ce concept pour une étude du protestantisme en Grande-Bretagne au XVIIe siècle – en particulier la transmission du vécu religieux chez les groupes minoritaires – en examinant en quoi il diffère de l’étude de la religion populaire et d’une simple opposition à la religion « légale ».

L’application de la religion vécue à l’époque moderne se pose en effet aujourd’hui, non seulement aux États-Unis, grâce aux travaux de David D. Hall, mais aussi en Europe, dans le contexte de la longue Réforme (Laurence Croq et David Garrioch [dir.], La Religion vécue. Les laïcs dans l’Europe moderne, 2013 ; Sari Katajala-Peltomaa et Raisa Maria Toivo [eds], Lived Religion and the Long Reformation in Northern Europe, 2016). Le développement actuel des études archivistiques sur les dissidents britanniques, essentiellement sous les derniers Stuarts, fait partie de cette tendance. L’étude des archives permet de mieux appréhender la tension entre les pratiques individuelles et les pratiques de groupe, la question de la discipline ecclésiastique comme facteur de cohésion communautaire, les relations entre les différentes confessions, et la façon dont l’étude des textes et de la narrativité peut s’intégrer à une histoire du vécu religieux. »

Anne Dunan-Page est Professeur de littérature et de civilisation britanniques à Aix-Marseille Université où elle dirige le Laboratoire d’Études et de Recherche sur le Monde Anglophone (E.A 853). Son prochain ouvrage, L’Expérience puritaine. Vies et récits de dissidents (XVIIe-XVIIIe siècles) paraîtra à l’été 2017 aux Éditions du Cerf.

Mark Towsey : « ‘History is the Favourite Reading’: Manuscript notes and readers’ uses of the past in eighteenth-century Britain. » (02/03)

Mark Towsey de University of Liverpool, présentera sa communication « ‘History is the Favourite Reading’: Manuscript notes and readers’ uses of the past in eighteenth-century Britain. » le jeudi 2 mars 2017 de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, 75006, salle D421.
Résumé :
« Mark Towsey will talk about his forthcoming book, Reading History in Eighteenth-Century Britain and America, which aims to explain why historical books by Hume, Robertson, Gibbon and others were so widely read in the second half of the eighteenth century. The paper examines readers’ responses to these texts, revealing how they were used by readers in various contexts to help cope with a rapidly changing world marked by revolution, reform and the expansion of empire. Dr Towsey is a Reader in History at the University of Liverpool, and has published very widely on the history of reading and the history of libraries in the long eighteenth century. He recently held a coveted Mid-Career Fellowship from the British Academy, and was the Bibliographical Society of America’s Katharine Pantzer Senior Research Fellowship in Bibliography and the British Book Trade in 2015. »

Simon Macdonald: « The policing of British and Irish subjects in Paris during the revolutionary Terror » (02/02)

Cornel Zwierlein : « « The French and British in the Mediterranean, 1650-1750 – and the questions a History of ignorance asks for » (20/10)

Cornel Zwierlein, de la Ruhr-Universität Bochum, présentera sa communication « The French and British in the Mediterranean, 1650-1750 – and the questions a History of ignorance asks for » le jeudi 20 octobre 2016, de 17h30 à 19h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Résumé :

The history of the French and British trading empires in the early
modern Mediterranean is used as a setting to test a new general approach
to a history of ignorance: how can we understand the very act of
ignoring – in all kinds of political, economic, religious, cultural and
scientific communication – as a fundamental trigger that sets epistemes
in motion? Is the ‘structure’ of the Scientific Revolution between 1650
and 1750 just one specific type of what were in fact many epistemic
movements taking place at the same time – different, but comparable?
What was the role here of the European empires? The book deconstructs
central categories like the mercantilist ‘national’, the exchange of
‘confessions’ between Western and Eastern Christians, and the bridging
of cultural gaps between Europeans and Ottoman subjects, into forms of
communicating unknowns. Making those multiple unknowns explicit in a new
reflective way was the core of ‘enlightenment empires’.

Discutant: Daniel Foliard, Université Paris Nanterre

Mark Knights: « Anti-corruption in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-century Britain »

Mark Knights , de l’Université de Warwick, présentera sa communication « Anti-corruption in Seventeenth and Eighteenth-century Britain » le jeudi 18 février, de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Résumé:

This paper examines anti-corruption in Britain and its colonies, from the late sixteenth century reformation to the reform movements of the nineteenth century (when the term ‘anti-corruption’ was coined). There are a number of reasons why it makes sense to treat the topic across a period of 250 years. Lire la suite

Anne-Julie Etter: « ‘An object of desirable achievement’ : l’East India Company et la conservation des monuments en Inde (fin du 18e siècle – milieu du 19e siècle) »

Anne-Julie Etter, de l’Université Cergy-Pontoise, présentera sa communication « ‘An object of desirable achievement’ : l’East India Company et la conservation des monuments en Inde (fin du 18e siècle – milieu du 19e siècle) » le jeudi 17 décembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Vers 19h, la séance sera suivie d’un pot de fin d’année, au 3e étage de la Maison de la Recherche.

En raison des contrôles de sécurité, les personnes extérieures à Paris IV souhaitant assister à ce séminaire sont invitées à se munir d’une carte d’étudiant ou d’une carte professionnelle, ou encore d’une carte d’identité et de cette annonce imprimée.

Discutante: Isabelle Gadoin, de l’Université de Poitiers.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Résumé:

Cette présentation étudie les acteurs et les modalités de la conservation des monuments indiens de la fin du xviiie siècle aux années 1850, en mettant l’accent sur le rôle de l’East India Company, qui administre les possessions britanniques en Inde pendant le premier siècle colonial. Les initiatives de l’East India Company s’inscrivent en continuité avec les pratiques antérieures, qui relèvent d’un entretien régulier des édifices auquel participent le pouvoir souverain et les populations. Alors que la plupart des travaux sur le thème de la conservation en Inde traitent de la fin du xixe siècle et du xxe siècle à partir d’un examen de la législation sur les monuments historiques, la période du Company Raj attire l’attention sur les pratiques et les concepts indigènes et éclaire d’un jour nouveau les interactions entre métropole et colonie dans le domaine patrimonial.

Andy Wood: “Remembering social change and political conflict in early modern England”

Andy Wood, de l’Université de Durham, présentera sa communication « Remembering social change and political conflict in early modern England » le jeudi 3 décembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Podcast ci-dessous et sur le site de la SAS:

Discutant: Pierre Lurbe, de l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne.

Résumé: This paper deals with the ways in which memories of warfare, reformation, rebellion and civil war played out in England between the early sixteenth century and the early eighteenth century. It focusses in particular upon popular memory, deploying fresh archival material in order to reconstruct memories of religious, political and military conflict. The paper emphasises the significance of memories of conflict for the ways in which political identities confessional disputes were fought out within England. This was due, it is argued, to the continuing divisions of the 1640s – memories of which shaped political conflicts into the early Georgian period. The paper also engages with memories of religious and political conflict in the sixteenth century, arguing that those memories helped to shape contemporary understandings of the period as a distinct phase in English history.

James Raven, « Lottery Lives: a comparative social history of gambling and the state lotteries in eighteenth-century France, Britain and Ireland »

James Raven, de l’Université d’Essex, présentera sa communication “Lottery Lives: a comparative social history of gambling and the state lotteries in eighteenth-century France, Britain and Irelandle jeudi 26 novembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Résumé:

This paper derives from the writing of a book that will offer a wide-ranging and comparative European and American history of the English state lotteries that sustained government expenditure for more than 130 years before 1826. These lotteries provoked major social, religious, political, economic and even philosophical debate, but they (and most of their Continental equivalents) have largely disappeared from historical view. This is despite the reprise of British state lotteries from 1992, and the historical comparisons that their organisation, sponsorship and criticism suggest. I shall argue that the English Channel proved an important divide in lottery policy. Lire la suite

Adam Budd: “Patronage, Publishing, and the Circulation of Liberty: Thomas Hollis and His Catalogus Librorum Apud Andrew Millar, 1765”

Adam Budd, de l’université d’Édimbourg, présentera sa communication “Patronage, Publishing, and the Circulation of Liberty: Thomas Hollis and His Catalogus Librorum Apud Andrew Millar, 1765” le jeudi 12 novembre de 17h à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421.

Résumé:

Thomas Hollis (1720-74) was one of Britain’s most important philanthropists during the Age of Enlightenment — he commissioned, bound, and circulated republican books throughout the libraries of Europe, many years before the Fall of the Bastille. How did Hollis make this happen? What was the production network that enabled this great philanthropist to access this literature — and how did Hollis make his Library of Liberty?