Alvin Jackson : “Opposing Home Rule: Irish unionists, their ideas and strategies, 1886-1914″ (mercredi 04/12)


Avec le soutien de l’IUF, le SFBH accueillera Alvin Jackson, professeur à l’université d’Edimbourg le mercredi 4 décembre à 18h, dans l’amphithéâtre Michelet (Sorbonne), 46 rue St Jacques, pour une conférence intitulée :
 
“Opposing Home Rule: Irish unionists, their ideas and strategies, 1886-1914″.
 
Cette séance, conçue notamment pour les agrégatifs, est ouverte aux étudiants de toutes les universités comme à tous les collègues. Mais l’entrée est contrôlée et il faut se munir de sa carte d’étudiant ou de sa carte professionnelle.
La séance fera suite à la conférence donnée le mardi 3 dans le cadre du séminaire du CREC.
 
Elle remplace et annule la conférence d’Alvin Jackson initialement prévue, dans le programme annuel du SFBH, pour le jeudi 5 décembre au 26 rue Serpente (Maison de la Recherche – Paris Sorbonne).

Dr. Jackie Uí Chionna: “Family Networks in the Revolutionary Generation: The Ryans of Tomcoole, A Case Study.” (28/11)

Dr. Jackie Uí Chionna, de National University of Ireland, Galway, présentera sa communication “Family Networks in the Revolutionary Generation: The Ryans of Tomcoole, A Case Study.” le jeudi 28 novembre de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421.

The story of the Ryan girls is a fabulous family saga about a group of young women who were liberated by education and their own affirmative personalities in the early years of the 20th century…The standard biographies of Irish lives often ignore spouses and family connections, but these women were clearly influential on that revolutionary generation around them.’ Mary Kenny. Belfast Newsletter, 7 October 2014. Mary Kenny is an author, broadcaster, playwright and journalist.

Mary Kate (Kit), Josephine Mary (Min), Christina and Phyllis Ryan were sisters, and part of a close family circle, the Ryans, from Toomcoole, Co. Wexford, Ireland. Brought up in a strongly nationalist family, all of the sisters progressed to university, and their education, relationships and social circles placed them at the very heart of the revolutionary movement in the period 1912-1922.  Three of the sisters were in relationships with leading figures in the 1916 Rising – Phyllis and Min themselves served as messengers during the Rising. But they were also bright young women, who studied abroad, and whilst studying in London and Paris, they communicated with each other by way of a writing book or jotter, which was then circulated from one sister to another. They also wrote copious amounts of letters to each other, comparing notes on everything from political movements to their latest boyfriends and social lives. This will examine the correspondence of the Ryan sisters as a case study in the significance of family networks for the revolutionary generation in British and Irish history.

Sheila Rowbotham : “Memories of the  beginnings of  Women’s Liberation groups  in Britain  in  1969” (21/11)

Sheila Rowbotham présentera sa communication “Memories of the  beginnings of  Women’s Liberation groups  in Britain  in  1969” le jeudi 21 novembre de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

Sheila Rowbotham, who helped to start the women’s liberation movement in Britain, has written widely on the history of feminism and radical social movements, her most recent books are Edward Carpenter: A Life of Liberty and Love (2008) Dreamers of a New Day (2010) and Rebel Crossings: New Women, Free Lovers and Radicals in Britain and the United States. (2016) Formerly a professor at Manchester University. She is now an   Honorary Fellow  at  Manchester  and  has  received  an  honorary  doctorate  from  the  University of  Sheffield.

Pierre Purseigle : “Reparation, reconstruction, and remembrance. The reconfiguration of the transatlantic alliance in the aftermath of the First World War” (14/11)

Pierre Purseigle (Université de Warwick et IEA Paris Seine) présentera sa communication “Reparation, reconstruction, and remembrance. The reconfiguration of the transatlantic alliance in the aftermath of the First World War” le jeudi 14 novembre 2019 de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

Abstract : “Based on a work-in-progress on the comparative and transnational history of urban reconstruction after 1918, this paper sets out to explain why the Allied powers, and specifically Britain and the USA, never lived up the expectations of the “sinistrés.” This story however is not simply that of the dissolution of a wartime coalition. This paper will place the process of reconstruction in the wider context of wartime mobilisation and post-conflict demobilisation. It will seek not to reprise the long-lasting debate over peace-making and reparations, but to supplement conventional approaches to the consolidation of Western Europe after the conflict. It will highlight a long-underestimated circulation of representations, people and funds as well as the transnational networks of sociability that contributed to the reconstruction of Belgium and France.”

Elise Smith: “Skulls, Nation and Empire: The Rise and Fall of British Craniology, 1800-1939” (07/11)

Elise Smith, Assistant Professor en histoire de la médecine à l’Université de Warwick, présentera son ouvrage à paraître chez Cambridge University Press, Skulls, Nation and Empire: The Rise and Fall of British Craniology, 1800-1939, le jeudi 7 novembre 2019 de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

Abstract :

“In the nineteenth century, craniometry, the study of skull measurements, became one of the most commonly employed tools of anthropologists, anatomists, biologists and statisticians as they investigated human racial variation and development. This paper charts the mature development of craniometry as a quantitative enterprise in Victorian Britain, examining efforts to transform racial anthropology into an objective ‘science of man.’ In the process, it reveals how the collection and measurement of skulls operated as a complementary enterprise, requiring an advanced infrastructure of specimen collection, instrumentation, and institutional support. Although craniometry was employed both a basis for classification and a means by which peoples could be ranked according to their perceived cognitive abilities, its ostensible neutrality was undermined by an internal lack of standardization and increasingly sophisticated statistical techniques that challenged its core assumptions. The history of craniometry’s ‘rise and fall’ thus shows how shifting criteria for scientific acceptance shaped understandings of human difference against a backdrop of imperial expansion and professional anxieties”.

Lina Weber: « Political economy after Enlightenment. The case of Dugald Stewart » (24/10)

Lina Weber, de University of St Andrews, présentera sa communication « Political economy after Enlightenment. The case of Dugald Stewart » le jeudi 24 octobre 2019 de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

Abstract

Scholars often assigned Dugald Stewart (1753-1828) a crucial role in popularising and disseminating the Scottish Enlightenment. A highly esteemed professor for moral philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, Stewart was the first to dedicate a separate academic course on political economy in Britain. Since he never published these lectures and his manuscripts were burnt posthumously, scholars have relied on the edition made by William Hamilton in the 1850s. Drawing on hitherto-neglected notes of students, this paper will shed new light on Stewart’s political economy and on his position between the Enlightenment and Victorian liberalism.
 
Biographie : Lina Weber a soutenu en 2019 une thèse à l’université d’Amsterdam intitulée “‘Bound by debt. Political arguments concerning state finance in Great Britain and the Dutch Republic, 1694-1795’. Elle a publié des articles sur la pensée économique de David Hume et d’isaac Iselin. Elle est actuellement postdoctorante à l’université de St Andrews (Ecosse), et participe au projet « Après les Lumières – la vie intellectuelle en Ecosse de 1790 à 1843 » financé par le Leverhulme Trust. Elle travaille notamment sur l’économie politique et la philosophie morale de Dugald Stewart.

Cesare Cuttica : « Democracy in Early Modern England. A Challenge Then and a Challenge Now » (17/10)

Cesare Cuttica (Paris 8), présentera sa communication « Democracy in Early Modern England. A Challenge Then and a Challenge Now » le jeudi 17 octobre 2019 de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421
 
Résumé
 Churchill once famously declared: “democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time”. This was not true for the great majority of thinkers who wrote about politics in the early modern period. In fact, deep mistrust of popular rule that had originated in ancient Greece, and had persisted through to the Roman epoch into the Middle Ages, found fertile ground in early modern England. Yet the observation that since democracy back then did not exist, pre-nineteenth-century criticisms of it are not worth exploring has led the historiographical mainstream to neglect some major questions: why was this so? How was such widespread criticism of popular government articulated? In what ways did different authors and genres depict the people and their power? Which political concerns, social prejudices and clusters of values informed this anti-democratic paradigm? What was democracy actually thought to stand for?
In order to address these points my talk analyses how anti-democratic ideas were elaborated in various sources in the late Tudor and early Stuart reigns. In particular, it offers a panoramic view onto the variegated landscape of anti-democratic thought to show the remarkable continuity informing its rhetoric. My presentation also reveals how political and religious discourse(s) as well as events were defined by concerns surrounding democracy – not republicanism: so much so that we can speak of democracy as an omnipresent challenge at a plurality of levels in early modern English public life. Inevitably selective, my approach provides a hopefully innovative illustration of an important but overlooked topic as well as an examination of the long-term relevance of principles that are still much debated today.
 
Cesare Cuttica est Maître de conférences en civilisation britannique au Département d’Études des Pays Anglophones de l’Université Paris 8 et membre de l’E.A. 1569 Transferts critiques anglophones (TransCrit).

Jacinthe de Montigny : « La perception du Canada dans la presse anglaise et française au midi du XVIIIe siècle (1739-1763) » (10/10/2019)

Jacinthe de Montigny (Québec – Trois Rivières), présentera sa communication « La perception du Canada dans la presse anglaise et française au midi du XVIIIe siècle (1739-1763) » le jeudi 10 octobre 2019 de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e, salle D421

Résumé: Lors de cette intervention, Jacinthe De Montigny présentera les éléments qui encadrent son projet doctoral qui porte sur la perception du Canada dans l’opinion publique anglaise et française au midi du XVIIIe siècle. Par l’intermédiaire d’un bref bilan historiographique, d’une présentation des sources à l’étude et de la structure méthodologique, elle fera la preuve qu’il importe de se questionner sur les enjeux qui entourent le Canada dans les discours écrits dans la presse pour comprendre comment la France et la Grande-Bretagne ont préparé leur population respective à la conservation ou la conquête de cette colonie avant, pendant et après la guerre de Sept Ans (1756-1763).
 
Biographie : Jacinthe De Montigny est candidate au doctorat en histoire à l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières et à l’Université Paris IV-Sorbonne sous la direction de Messieurs Laurent Turcot et François-Joseph Ruggiu. Ses recherches portent sur la perception du Canada dans l’opinion publique anglaise et française dans la première moitié du XVIIIe siècle. Déposé en janvier 2016 à l’Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, son mémoire est intitulé : « La conquête du Canada était-elle préméditée? : une étude des journaux londoniens entre 1744 et 1763 ». Elle collabore également à la Chaire de recherche du Canada en histoire des loisirs et des divertissements (UQTR) et au Centre Roland-Mousnier (Paris IV-Sorbonne).

Discutant : Jean-François Dunyach (Sorbonne Université)

Professeur Anne Curry et Dr. Guilhem Pépin : « Le programme de publication en ligne “The Gascon Rolls Project”, suivi d’une étude de cas sur ces rôles et le traité de Troyes » (03/10/2019)

Professeur Anne Curry et Dr Guilhem Pépin présenteront leur communication sur “Le programme de publication en ligne “The Gascon Rolls Project”, suivi d’une étude de cas sur ces rôles et le traité de Troyes” le jeudi 3 octobre de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421

Résumé : L’année 2019 signera la fin du programme de publication en ligne des résumés détaillés en anglais des rôles gascons qui étaient restés inédits jusqu’alors (1317 à 1467). Les rôles gascons constitue la source historique essentielle concernant l’administration du duché d’Aquitaine (ou de Guyenne) possédé par les rois d’Angleterre. Les rôles (rouleaux de parchemin) sont conservés de nos jours aux Archives Nationales Britanniques (The National Archives) de Kew, dans la banlieue sud-ouest de Londres.

Une présentation générale de la richesse de leur contenu sera présentée et sera suivie d’une étude de cas autour du traité de Troyes et l’Aquitaine. Enfin, une démonstration en direct du fonctionnement du site web, accessible à tous, sera organisée.

Christopher Fletcher, « Les masculinités et la difficile émergence d’une culture politique “publique” au XIIIe siècle » (26/09)

Christopher Fletcher présentera sa communication « Les masculinités et la difficile émergence d’une culture politique “publique” au XIIIe siècle » le jeudi 26 septembre 2019 de 17h à 18h30. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421

“Entre le début du XIIIe siècle et le milieu du XIVe siècle, la culture politique anglaise subit une série de mutations, due au développement de la fiscalité, du système judiciaire, de la représentation politique, des requêtes et pétitions, de l’utilisation des jurys d’enquête et de formes de comptabilité, que l’on peut qualifier de l’émergence d’une culture politique « publique ». Ces développements sont bien connus des historiens, mais ils n’ont pas encore considérés dans leur aspect genré : comment ils changent les rapports de force entre différentes masculinités (et féminités) politiques. Cette intervention propose une première esquisse, en se concentrant sur les débuts de ce processus pendant le règne d’Henri III (1216-1272).”

Christopher Fletcher est chargé de recherche CNRS, affilié à l’IRHiS (université de Lille). Il a notamment publié Richard II: Manhood, Youth and Politics (2008). Il a récemment édité un large « handbook » dédié aux masculinités et cultures politiques de l’antiquité à nos jours chez Palgrave Macmillan (2018). Il s’intéresse à l’histoire du genre, à l’histoire politique et sociale, des îles Britanniques et du nord de l’Europe à la fin du Moyen Âge.

Programme 2019-2020

Attention, les horaires ont changé : sauf indication contraire, les séances ont lieu le jeudi de 17h à 18h30 à la Maison de la Recherche de l’université Paris-Sorbonne (28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e), salle D421.

Le programme 2019-2020 du séminaire est aussi disponible sous l’onglet “Programme 2019-2020”.

Jeudi 26 septembre : Chris Fletcher (CNRS), « Les masculinités et la difficile émergence d’une culture politique publique : Angleterre, XIIIe siècle »

Jeudi 3 octobre : Anne Curry (Southampton), « Les rôles gascons, Henri V et le traité de Troyes »

Jeudi 10 octobre : Jacinthe de Montigny (Québec – Trois Rivières), « La perception du Canada dans la presse anglaise et française au midi du XVIIIe siècle (1739-1763) »

Jeudi 17 octobre:   Cesare Cuttica (Paris 8), “Democracy in Early Modern England. A Challenge Then and a Challenge Now”

Jeudi 24 octobre : Lina Weber (St Andrews) « Political economy after Enlightenment. The case of Dugald Stewart »

Jeudi 7 novembre : Elise Smith (Warwick), à propos de son ouvrage à paraître Skulls, Nation and Empire: The Rise and Fall of British Craniology, 1800-1939 (Cambridge UP)

Jeudi 14 novembre : Pierre Purseigle (Warwick / IEA Paris Seine), “Reparation, reconstruction, and remembrance. The reconfiguration of the transatlantic alliance in the aftermath of the First World War”

Jeudi 21 novembre : Sheila Rowbotham (Manchester), “Memories of the beginnings of Women’s Liberation groups  in   Britain  in  1969”

Jeudi 28 novembre: Dr. Jackie Uí Chionna (National University of Ireland, Galway), “Family Networks in the Revolutionary Generation: The Ryans of Tomcoole, A Case Study”

Jeudi 5 décembre (salle D040): Alvin Jackson (University of Edinburgh), “Opposing Home Rule: Irish Unionists, their ideas and strategies (1886-1914)”

Jeudi 12 décembre: Jane Humphries (All Souls, Oxford), “History from Underneath: Girls and the Industrial Revolution”

Jeudi 19 décembre : Malcom Walsby (Lyon): “Made in France. La Grande Bretagne et l’industrie française du livre à la Renaissance »

Jeudi 30 janvier (salle D040) : Projection du documentaire de la BBC « A House through time » (David Olusoga, 2018), sur l’histoire d’une maison de Liverpool depuis 1840, suivie d’une brève discussion sur les sources nouvelles pour l’histoire des individus

Jeudi 6 février : David Rundle (University of Kent), “Humanism in fifteenth-century England and the Continent: vectors of travel”

Jeudi 13 février : Marion Leclair (Arras), « Quels lecteurs pour le roman radical anglais ? (1780-1850) »

Jeudi 27 février: Steven O’Connor (Sorbonne Université) : “‘This French force must be an asset and not a liability’: the British approach to coalition warfare during the Second World War”

Jeudi 5 mars : Stéphane Jettot (Sorbonne Université) : « La commercialisation des généalogies britanniques au 18e siècle »

Jeudi 12 mars: Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (University College London): “”Something changed, I’m sure it did, for women; it must have”: Feminism, equality, and individualism in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields after 1945”

Jeudi 19 mars : Aude de Mézerac-Zanetti (Lille), « ‘Ceci n’est pas une Réforme’ : les changements liturgiques sous le règne d’Henri VIII »

Jeudi 26 mars: Ben Griffin (Girton College, Cambridge), “The gender order and the judicial imagination: masculinity, liberalism and governmentality in modern Britain”

Jeudi 2 avril : Sandrine Parageau (Nanterre / IUF), « ‘Que sçay-je?’ Une histoire de l’ignorance dans l’Angleterre de la première modernité »

Jeudi 23 avril: Martha McGill (Warwick) : “Ghosts and national identity in long-eighteenth-century Scotland”

Jeudi 30 avril : Marie Ruiz (Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens), « Les stratégies genrées des sociétés d’émigration et des centres de formation dans l’Empire britannique »

Jeudi 7 mai: Gareth Curless (Exeter), “Labour, Decolonization and Class: Remaking Colonial Workers at the End of the British Empire”

Jeudi 14 mai : Ariane Mak (Université de Paris) : “Arrested on suspicion of spying. Mass-Observation investigators and the perils of wartime surveys”

David Wootton, “Power, pleasure and profit: insatiable appetites from Hobbes to Smith” (09/05)

David Wootton (Anniversary Professor, University of York) présentera sa communication “Power, pleasure and profit: insatiable appetites from Hobbes to Smith” autour de son livre Power, Pleasure and Profit (Harvard UP, 2018) jeudi 9 mai 2019 de 17h30 à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421

“My argument is that moral, social, and economic life was transformed in line with Hobbes’s claim that pleasure and happiness are purely subjective, and that there is no summum bonum or highest good. I trace the impact of this view through the moral, political and economic thinking of the Enlightenment, particularly the British Enlightenment, from Locke to Bentham. In my talk I will touch briefly on some of the key themes of my book (with particular reference to Hume), and I will look in particular at a topic where much of the pioneering intellectual work was French, but which lie at the heart of Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations (1776): the question of famine. I will argue that Smith’s inability to think about famine is symptomatic of the intellectual failures of the post-Hobbesian Enlightenment. These intellectual failures continue to be our own.”

David Wootton is Anniversary Professor of History at the University of York. He works on European cultural and intellectual history from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. He has published widely on the history of science and medicine (Bad Medicine: Doctors doing harm since Hippocrates, 2006, Galileo: Watcher of the Skies, 2010 and The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution, 2016). His latest book, Power, Pleasure and Profit: Insatiable Appetites from Machiavelli to Madison was recently published by Harvard University Press (2018). 

Discutante : Catherine Marshall (Cergy-Pontoise)

Contact : Emmanuelle de Champs: emmanuelle.de-champ@u-cergy.fr  

Helen Berry: “Problems with philanthropy in eighteenth-century Britain: industry, empire and the fate of London’s foundlings” (18/04)

Helen Berry (Université de Newcastle), “Problems with philanthropy in eighteenth-century Britain: industry, empire and the fate of London’s foundlings”. Jeudi 18 avril 2019 de 17h30 à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421

«  Helen Berry’s new book Orphans of Empire: the Fate of London’s Foundlings (Oxford: OUP, 2019) tells the story of what happened to the thousands of children who were raised at the London Foundling Hospital, Coram’s brainchild, which opened in 1741 and grew to become the most famous charity in Georgian England. It provides vivid insights into the lives and fortunes of London’s poorest children, from the earliest days of the Foundling Hospital to the mid-Victorian era, when Charles Dickens was moved by his observations of the charity’s work to campaign on behalf of orphans. Through the lives of London’s foundlings, this book provides readers with a street-level insight into the wider global history of a period of monumental change in British history as the nation grew into the world’s leading superpower. Some foundling children were destined for Britain’s ‘outer Empire’ overseas, but many more toiled in the ‘inner Empire’, labouring in the cotton mills and factories of northern England at the dawn of the new industrial age.

Through extensive archival research, Helen Berry uncovers previously untold stories of what happened to former foundlings, including the suffering and small triumphs they experienced as child workers during the upheavals of the Industrial Revolution. Sometimes, using many different fragments of evidence, the voices of the children themselves emerge. Extracts from George King’s autobiography, the only surviving first-hand account written by a Foundling Hospital child born in the eighteenth century, published here for the first time, provide touching insights into how he came to terms with his upbringing. Remarkably he played a part in Trafalgar, one of the most iconic battles in British Naval history. His personal courage and resilience in overcoming the disadvantages of his birth form a lasting testimony to the strength of the human spirit. »   

Répondant : Isabelle Robin, Sorbonne Université

Laura Schwartz : “Feminism and the Servant Problem: Class and Domestic Labour in the British Women’s Suffrage Movement” (11/04)

Laura Schwartz, de University of Warwick, présentera sa communication “Feminism and the Servant Problem: Class and Domestic Labour in the British Women’s Suffrage Movement” le jeudi 11 avril 2019 de 17h30 à 19h. Maison de la Recherche, 28 rue Serpente, Paris 6e , salle D421

“In the early twentieth century, more and more women fought for the right to professional employment and political influence outside the home. Yet if liberation from household ‘drudgery’ meant employing another woman to do it, where did this leave domestic servants? Both inspired and frustrated by a growing feminist movement, servants began forming their own trade unions and demanding better conditions and rights at work. Feminism and the Servant Problem is the first ever history of how these militant maids and their mistresses joined forces in the struggle for the vote but also clashed over competing class interests. Laura Schwartz uncovers a forgotten history of domestic worker organising and early feminist thinking on reproductive labour, offering a new perspective on the class politics of the suffrage movement and challenging traditional notions of who made up the British working-class.”

Laura Schwartz is Associate Professor of Modern British History at the University of Warwick. She has published widely on the history of British feminism, and is the author of A Serious Endeavour: Gender, Education and Community at St Hugh’s, 1886-2011 (2011), and Infidel Feminism: Secularism, Religion and Women’s Emancipation in England, 1830-1914 (2013).

Discutante : Rebecca Rogers (Paris-Descartes)

Contact : Fabrice Bensimon fbensimon@free.fr