Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite: “Something changed, I’m sure it did, for women; it must have”: Deindustrialisation and individualism in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields after 1945 (1er octobre)

Attention : cette séance n’aura pas lieu à la Maison de la Recherche, mais uniquement en visioconférence: veuillez contacter fbensimon(at)free.fr pour avoir le lien


Jeudi 1er octobre à 17h : Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (University College London) : ‘”Something changed, I’m sure it did, for women; it must have”: Deindustrialisation and individualism in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields after 1945’
 
Economic historian Jim Tomlinson has recently suggested that deindustrialisation should be used as an alternative meta-narrative for understanding postwar British history, transecting the typical political narrative that structures understandings of the period – that is, the story of a ‘social democratic’ settlement inaugurated by Attlee and then disrupted in the 1970s and replaced with a Thatcherite or ‘neoliberal’ one.  Writing from the perspective of social and cultural history, I have recently written, along with Emily Robinson, Camilla Schofield, and Natalie Thomlinson, of the importance of growing discourses of popular individualism in the postwar decades, which, in a similar way, cut across and interacted with Thatcherism, but which were not driven predominantly by politics. In this paper, I analyse how deindustrialisation and individualism changed the structure and culture of family life in working-class families in Britain’s coalfields in the decades after 1945.


Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite travaille en particulier sur l’expérience des femmes dans la grève des mineurs de 1984-1985 https://www.coalfield-women.org